close

Global IT Outage Update

Every day we care for and treat hundreds of patients from Greater Manchester and beyond who come through our doors.

 

Today's global IT outage affected many organisations including ours but to put it into context, this outage affected less than a third of our patients.

 

Our staff worked tirelessly to deliver as many chemotherapy and immunotherapy treatments as possible and continue to finalise plans for those we were unable to see today due to issues affecting our supplier.

 

Thank you for being understanding and bearing with us. Unless our teams contact you, please attend for your appointment as planned.

 

We continue to work with our supplier to resolve this issue and prioritise our most clinically urgent patients. We apologise for any delays that have occurred as a result of this.

 

Any further updates will be published on our website and social media channels (Facebook and X/Twitter)

Skip to Content

Patient booklets

The Christie produces a range of patient information that covers various aspects of cancer and cancer treatments.

Booklets are free to patients coming to The Christie and are available from the cancer information centre (department 3). The centre offers a confidential service for anyone affected by cancer. Please call in or contact us by telephone on 0161 446 8100.

We also offer a number of chemotherapy and immunotherapy information sheets about individual systemic anti-cancer treatments.

We've also recreated a limited range of patient booklets digitally below.

Or find it alphabetically:

2

24-hour urine collection [Word, 153 KB]

A 24-hour urine collection is a complete collection of all the urine produced in a 24-hour period. This involves collecting all the urine in a specially provided container.

5

5FU cream for penile cancer (fluorouracil 5% cream) [PDF, 110 KB]

This information tells you about the treatment that has been recommended for you by your doctor. 5FU (fluorouracil) cream is a treatment for your condition. It is a medicine which is used to treat superficial pre-malignant or pre-cancerous skin lesions.

A

A guide for patients receiving radiotherapy on the MR-linac [PDF, 133 KB]

Your doctor has discussed with you the opportunity to have your radiotherapy treatment on a new treatment unit known as the MR-linac (magnetic resonance linear accelerator). The Christie is one of the first hospitals internationally to use this technology. The machine combines a normal radiotherapy unit with an MRI scanner. You may have had MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scans before at the hospital.

This machine will allow us to see the treatment area more clearly and adapt the treatment to improve accuracy.

A patient’s guide to The Christie [PDF, 2,437 KB]

We want you to be as comfortable as possible whilst you are being treated at The Christie. This booklet aims to provide you with general information about the hospital and our services.

A-Z of coping with nausea and vomiting [PDF, 1,177 KB]

This guide has been written to help you understand more about nausea (feeling sick) and vomiting (being sick). It contains information you may find useful to help manage sickness.

Abdominoperineal excision of the rectum (APER) [PDF, 264 KB]

This leaflet tells you about the procedure known as an abdominoperineal excision of rectum (APER). It explains what is involved, and some of the common complications associated with this procedure. It is not meant to replace discussion between you and your surgeon – it is intended to be used as a guide in connection to what is discussed.

Abscess drainage [PDF, 104 KB]

This leaflet tells you about the procedure known as abscess drainage and explains what is involved and what the benefits and risks are. It may help you to think of things you would like to discuss with your doctor.

Abstral® SL tablets [PDF, 97 KB]

Abstral® is used to treat breakthrough pain (a temporary flare in pain) related to cancer. The possible benefits of treatment vary; your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist will be happy to answer any questions you have about your treatment.

This should be read with the manufacturer’s patient information leaflet.

Actinic keratosis [PDF, 103 KB]

Actinic keratosis is also called Solar keratosis because it is caused by long-term exposure of skin to ultraviolet rays contained in the sunlight. It is a very common condition in white-skinned people particularly over the age of 50.

You can also read this information in an accessible format on our Actinic keratosis page.

Actiq® lozenge [PDF, 100 KB]

Actiq® is used to treat breakthrough pain (a temporary flare in pain) related to cancer. The possible benefits of treatment vary; your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist will be happy to answer any questions you have about your treatment.

Acute kidney injury (AKI) [PDF, 101 KB]

'Acute' means it has occurred over hours or days. 'Kidney injury' describes damage to the kidneys, usually with a change in the kidney function. It can be caused by dehydration, illness, infections, major surgery, when flow of urine from kidneys through the ureters or bladder is blocked as in prostate and cervical cancer, or it can be a side-effect of certain drugs.

Adjuvant bisphosphonate service (ABS) in the treatment of early breast cancer [PDF, 71 KB]

You have been given this leaflet because you have been referred to the adjuvant bisphosphonate service (ABS) and chosen to start bisphosphonate treatment for your early breast cancer.

Advance care planning [PDF, 531 KB]

A guide for patients and their carers to think of some answers to questions about current health, people involved in a patient's care and future planning.

Advance decision to refuse treatment [Publisher document, 181 KB]

Some people choose to plan ahead if they are facing a progressive illness. Before their illness becomes too severe, and whilst they can still make their own decisions, some people may want to record what treatment and care they wish to have in the future. This leaflet can help you to talk openly with your family and friends, and the professionals involved in your care if you so wish.

Advice following abdominal surgery [PDF, 115 KB]

This booklet is designed to help you after your discharge from hospital and to guide your return to activity. It covers how often you should be walking, how to get in and out of bed and how to deal with pain or discomfort.

After your MRI contrast/dye injection (proton beam therapy) [PDF, 181 KB]

You have been given an injection of MRI contrast/dye to help highlight the area of interest on your magnetic resonance scan. A reaction to the contrast/dye is extremely rare. However, if a reaction does occur, this usually happens shortly after the injection. These effects are usually very mild and do not last long.

You can also read this information in an accessible format on our After your MRI contrast/dye injection page.

Alcohol intrathecal neurolysis [PDF, 103 KB]

Your doctor has suggested that you may benefit from this procedure. It is a specialised type of nerve block.

Alfentanil injection [PDF, 111 KB]

Alfentanil is used to treat pain that is difficult to control. It is offered as a guide to you and your family. The possible benefits of treatment vary; your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist will be happy to answer any questions you have about your treatment. 

This should be read with the manufacturer’s patient information leaflet.

Alpelisib [PDF, 169 KB]

This leaflet is about a treatment for cancer called alpelisib. The treatment is prescribed in 4 weekly cycles. If your team prescribes alpelisib for you, this leaflet will explain how often you need to take it and what the main side effects are.

An easier to eat, nourishing diet [PDF, 1.20 MB]

With some types of illness or treatment, you may experience a sore mouth or swallowing problems, which makes eating difficult. This booklet covers the sort of food that might be easier for you to eat at this time.

You can also read this information in an accessible format on our An easier to eat, nourishing diet page.

An introduction to the proton beam therapy service [PDF, 4,925 KB]

This folder provides you with all the information you need to know throughout your proton beam therapy treatment at The Christie. As well as this folder you will be given other information more specific to your illness and treatment.

Anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) [Word, 174 KB]

Anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) is the name given to the appearance of abnormal cells in the skin just inside or immediately outside the anus. Sometimes AIN occurs in both places at the same time, and in women, may occur at nearby sites of the vulva (VIN) and cervix (CIN).

Angiogram [PDF, 111 KB]

This leaflet tells you about the procedure known as angiogram. It explains what is involved and the benefits and risks. It may make you think of the things you would like to discuss with your doctor/s.

Antacid and oxetacaine oral suspension [PDF, 103 KB]

Oxetacaine is a topical anaesthetic, which effectively relieves pain when applied to the lining of the mouth and food pipe. The antacids neutralize stomach acid and prevent further irritation of the food pipe. Antacid also thickens the liquid to help carry the oxetacaine and coat the food pipe.

Antegrade ureteric stenting [PDF, 112 KB]

This leaflet tells you about the procedure known as antegrade ureteric stenting. It explains what is involved and the benefits and risks. It may make you think of the things you would like to discuss with your doctor/s.

Anticoagulant alert card [PDF, 45 KB]

Serious side effects of anticoagulation can include an increased risk of bleeding. Contact The Christie Hotline with any other clinical queries but for any of the symptoms on this card, you should seek emergency medical attention via 999 or your local A&E department.

Apheresis

This leaflet is intended to provide you with some general information before undertaking apheresis, including where you'll need to go and what steps you'll need to follow.

Arginine stimulation test [PDF, 103 KB]

This is an information sheet about the arginine stimulation test to check if the body is producing enough growth hormone.

Ascitic drainage [PDF, 110 KB]

This leaflet covers what happens if your doctor thinks that there is excess fluid or 'ascites' in your abdomen (tummy) which needs draining. Either a specialist nurse from the procedure team or a radiologist will carry out this procedure on the integrated procedure unit (IPU).

Aspen Vista cervical collar [PDF, 444 KB]

This booklet explains how to fit an Aspen Vista cervical collar around the neck, when you need to wear it and how you need to clean it.

Axillary lymph node dissection [PDF, 145 KB]

The surgery you are going to have is called an axillary lymph node dissection or clearance. This means removing the lymph nodes or glands from one or both armpits. It is major surgery and is carried out under a general anaesthetic.

Cancer of the appendix [PDF, 118 KB]

Appendix tumours are unusual, accounting for 0.4% of all cancers of the bowel. Cancers of the appendix can spread to other parts of the abdomen and have secondary growths that attach to other organs or the inner lining of the abdominal and pelvic cavity which is called the peritoneum. These are called peritoneal metastases.

The ADAPT programme [PDF, 101 KB]

ADAPT (Managed Local Follow up of Long-Term Lymphoma Survivors) is a planned individualised programme of care, that focuses on your future health and wellbeing now that your lymphoma has been treated and the risk of it returning is very low.

B

After your skin biopsy [PDF, 104 KB]

This leaflet explains how to take care of your wound(s) when you leave hospital. If you have any questions, please see our contact details on the back page of the leaflet.

Banding of haemorrhoids (piles) [PDF, 110 KB]

Haemorrhoids are prominent clumps of tissue containing blood vessels that lie inside and around the back passage (lower rectum or anus). Banding of haemorrhoids is done by placing a small elastic band around the neck of the haemorrhoid which stops the blood supply.

Basal cell carcinoma [PDF, 103 KB]

Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is also known as rodent ulcer. It is the most common type of skin cancer in white-skinned people. It usually occurs on sun-exposed areas of skin in the middle-aged and elderly, but it may grow on any area of skin and can occur in younger people.

You can also read this information in an accessible format on our Basal cell carcinoma page.

Baxter Infusor guide [PDF, 281 KB]

This is a booklet about the Baxter infusor (also called the Baxter pump), a lightweight, disposable device containing chemotherapy used to give a slow, continuous infusion into the bloodstream via a CVC (central venous catheter) or PICC (peripherally inserted central venous catheter).

Bereavement services at The Christie [PDF, 1.03 MB]

The loss of a relative or friend can be a difficult and confusing time with lots of details to sort out - help is available if you need it. This booklet will offer you help and guidance about what to do next.

You can also read this information in an accessible format on our Bereavement services at The Christie page.

Bladder filling protocol [PDF, 115 KB]

This is an information sheet for patients who need to follow the bladder filling protocol to ensure their bladder remains the same size throughout their treatment.

Blood test sheet [PDF, 102 KB]

Information sheet about what patients should expect when attending for a blood test to assess hormone levels.

Bone marrow harvest [PDF, 110 KB]

This leaflet is for all patients having a bone marrow harvest and explains what it is and what happens during the harvest. Bone marrow is harvested (taken) from both of your hipbones and, very occasionally, from your sternum (breastbone) using a needle. This takes place in the operating theatre, and you will need to have a general anaesthetic.

Bowen's disease [PDF, 103 KB]

Bowen's disease is a skin lesion that affects the topmost layer (epidermis) of the skin. It appears as a red or brown scaly patch and it is usual to have a single lesion. It most commonly occurs on the lower leg but it can develop on any part of the body. People over the age of 60 are more likely to develop these lesions and they are rare in the under-30 age group.

You can also read this information in an accessible format on our Bowen's disease page.

Breast reconstruction using tissue expanders [PDF, 93 KB]

A tissue expander is like an uninflated balloon made of silicone. It is placed under the skin and muscle of the chest wall in the breast area.

Breast reduction surgery [PDF, 89 KB]

The main benefit of breast reduction surgery is that it can be used to resize and reshape a remaining breast following a mastectomy and/or a previous breast reconstruction. This will improve the symmetry with the remaining breast.

Bringing food and drink into hospital: information for patients, carers and relatives [PDF, 133 KB]

The Christie provides a variety of high quality, safe and nutritious food and drinks to patients in hospital. Great care is taken to provide food which is right for the needs of individual patients.

Choices suitable for all special dietary requirements are available, whether medical, religious, conscientious or personal. Diet is part of the essential care of the patient. If it is not right the patient may recover less quickly.

Buccolam® Midazolam oromucosal liquid [PDF, 288 KB]

Midazolam is a fast-acting sedative. It is used for several purposes including help with muscle spasms, and also in the control and prevention of fits. Buccolam® is the form of midazolam when it is given by mouth.

Buccolam® can be an easy and effective way to give relief of distressing symptoms at home, but it must be used in the situation(s) recommended in this leaflet.

Having a skin biopsy [PDF, 110 KB]

This leaflet explains what a skin biopsy is and the benefits, risks and alternatives of this procedure. If you have any questions, please speak to your doctor or nurse.

Information about your bone scan [PDF, 110 KB]

A nuclear medicine bone scan allows us to take pictures of your bones in a different way to X-rays, which will help your consultant diagnose or manage your condition.

To perform the scan, you will be given an injection containing a small amount of radioactivity called a radioactive tracer. Over time the radioactive tracer collects in the bones and then we can take pictures of them on a scanner called a gamma camera.

Information for bladder cancer patients receiving carbogen and nicotinamide [PDF, 104 KB]

This information sheet is to tell you about a treatment you will be having as part of your bladder cancer treatment. You have cancer in the bladder which requires a course of radiotherapy.

You can also read this information in an accessible format on our Bladder carbogen and nicotinamide (BCON) radiotherapy page.

Information for patients receiving radiotherapy for bone pain [PDF, 111 KB]

This leaflet is a guide for patient for patients receiving radiotherapy for bone pain. Cancer cells can cause thinning areas of the bone.  These may be painful and can sometimes even lead to fractures.  

Radiotherapy after breast surgery [PDF, 1.37 KB]

This booklet is to tell you about radiotherapy after breast surgery. Please try to read this booklet before your next appointment at The Christie.

Radiotherapy to the bladder [PDF, 1,738 KB]

This booklet is to tell you about radiotherapy to the bladder. The Christie is a specialised centre for radiotherapy and patients come for treatments that are not always available at general hospitals. If you are having radiotherapy as an inpatient, please bring this booklet with you.

Radiotherapy to the whole brain and spine [PDF, 87 KB]

Radiotherapy works by damaging dividing cells in our bodies. Because cancer cells are not able to repair themselves as efficiently as normal cells, more cancer cells will be destroyed.

For some types of brain tumour, for example germ cell tumours, medulloblastoma and occasionally in low grade gliomas, radiotherapy treatment, which may follow chemotherapy or surgery includes treatment to the whole brain and spine to reduce risk of disease recurrence in these areas.

The Macmillan secondary and locally advanced breast care nurse specialist service [PDF, 100 KB]

The Christie secondary breast care nursing service is a team of highly qualified and experienced nurses who have specialist knowledge and skills in the care and support of patients with secondary breast cancer and locally advanced breast cancer - read more about what the service offers in this booklet.

What to expect during the first year of diagnosis of secondary breast cancer [PDF, 101 KB]

Whilst attending The Christie you will be given the contact details of the Macmillan secondary breast clinical nurse specialists (CNS). This leaflet covers the support pathway you should expect to receive during the first year following your diagnosis.

We encourage you to attend your appointment to the nurse-led clinic as this contact then leads on to additional available support, if required.

You can also read this information in an accessible format on our Support for secondary breast cancer patients page.

C

After your CT contrast/dye injection [PDF, 103 KB]

After your CT contrast/dye injection, we will ask you to wait in the department with the cannula in your arms for 15 minutes. We keep the cannula in place in case we need to give you some medication if you have a reaction.

You can also read this information in an accessible format on our After your CT contrast/dye injection page.

Carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) [PDF, 101 KB]

Enterobacteriaceae are bacteria that usually live harmlessly in the gut of humans. However, if the bacteria get into the wrong place, such as the bladder or bloodstream, they can cause infection.

Some strains of these bacteria are resistant to some antibiotics – so if you are infected with these bacteria, we will need to treat you a little differently to stop the bacteria spreading.

Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) [PDF, 101 KB]

Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) is a non-invasive method used to assess the performance of the heart and lungs at rest and during exercise. This leaflet covers when you might need a CPET and what this involves.

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: information for patients and carers [PDF, 144 KB]

This leaflet explains what cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is, how decisions about CPR are made, and how you will know whether CPR is relevant to you.

Care of your central venous catheter [PDF, 1,421 KB]

This booklet contains information about central venous catheters (CVC). These are sometimes called long lines or Hickman® catheters.

The first part of the booklet describes what they are and how they are put in. Please make sure you read all this section before you have your line inserted. The second part of the booklet tells you how to care for the line and answers some frequently asked questions.

Cervical (neck) lymph node dissection [PDF, 145 KB]

The surgery you are going to have is a cervical lymph node dissection or clearance. This means removing the lymph nodes or glands from one or both sides of the neck. There are various types of surgery to remove neck lymph nodes. It is major surgery and is carried out under a general anaesthetic.

Changes to your voice during and following radiotherapy [PDF, 114 KB]

Radiotherapy can result in a dry, sore and swollen throat. Radiation to the larynx will affect your vocal cords, producing changes to your voice. This leaflet covers how you can protect your voice, and what treatment the speech and language department at The Christie can offer for this.

Checking your blood glucose levels [PDF, 116 KB]

A booklet outlining how and why the nurse checks your blood glucose levels.

Chemo-radiotherapy to the head and neck: swallowing difficulties [PDF, 103 KB]

Swallowing difficulties are common after chemo-radiotherapy to the head and neck, as movements to the structures essential for swallowing, such as the tongue and larynx (voice box), may be impaired. This leaflet covers some of the difficulties you might face, and what treatment a speech and language therapist can offer for this.

Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cell (CAR T cell) Therapy [PDF, 94 KB]

CAR T cell therapy is a new treatment. It involves using your own body’s immune system to treat your cancer. Our immune systems monitor for unhealthy cells or foreign invaders such as infection or viruses. It uses several kinds of blood cells to destroy anything unfamiliar by recognising the unique protein (antigen) and identifying them as foreign.

Cholangiogram [PDF, 109 KB]

This leaflet tells you about the procedure known as a cholangiogram. It explains what is involved and what the benefits and risks are. It may make you think of things you would like to discuss with your doctor.

Clinical trials at The Christie [PDF, 135 KB]

The Christie is an international leader in cancer research and therefore you may be approached to take part in a research study or clinical trial. All information will remain entirely confidential, and you will always be approached directly to take part in a clinical trial.

Clonazepam 1mg/1ml injection (Rivotril®) [PDF, 112 KB]

Clonazepam is used to treat pain that is difficult to control. The possible benefits of treatment vary; your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist will be happy to answer any questions you have about your treatment.

Clonazepam tablets [PDF, 112 KB]

Clonazepam is used to treat pain that is difficult to control. The possible benefits of treatment vary; your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist will be happy to answer any questions you have about your treatment.

Coeliac plexus blockade [PDF, 104 KB]

Your doctor has suggested that you may benefit from this procedure. It is a specialised type of nerve block that is usually used to treat cancer pain arising from the organs of the upper abdomen.

Collecting peripheral blood stem cells [PDF, 109 KB]

This information is written to guide you through each stage of the stem cell or bone marrow collection process. The clinical apheresis unit forms part of the haematology and transplant day unit and is run by specially trained nurses who will co-ordinate and carry out your stem cell collection.

You can also read this information in an accessible format on our Collecting peripheral blood stem cells page.

Colon transit X-ray examination [Word, 180 KB]

A colon transit examination is used to find out how long it takes for food to pass through your colon (large bowel). You will have 6 capsules to take over 3 consecutive days.

Colonic stent – your procedure explained [PDF, 567 KB]

This leaflet tells you about the procedure called a colonic stent. It explains what is involved, and the benefits and risks. It may make you think of things you would like to discuss with your doctor.

Colorectal and peritoneal oncology centre [PDF, 133 KB]

This leaflet cover things you need to remember when you’re discharged from The Christie after abdominal surgery, including recovery time, wound care and when you can expect to be able to walk again.

Colorectal cancer and cytoreductive surgery with heated intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) [PDF, 118 KB]

Surgery has traditionally not been used with the intention of curing the cancer when it spreads to the peritoneum. However, there is evidence that if the size and spread of the cancer is limited then a special surgical technique called 'cytoreductive surgery' that removes all the visible disease can be helpful.

Coming to the proton beam therapy centre at The Christie [PDF, 2,751 KB]

Proton beam therapy is a type of radiotherapy. Protons are small particles found in the middle of atoms. They can be used to give carefully calculated doses of radiation to treat diseases. This means the dose to the tumour can be given very accurately and there is little or no dose to normal tissue past the tumour.

You can also read this information in an accessible format on our What happens when you are approved for proton beam therapy at The Christie page.

Complementary health and well-being [PDF, 785 KB]

A guide for patients and their carers to the complementary health and well-being service at The Christie.

Complex discharge team [PDF, 100 KB]

Most inpatients will be given a predicted discharge date soon after their admission to hospital. This is widely recognised as good practice and improves the patient’s experience, helping them to feel more in control.

Concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy for sarcoma [PDF, 136 KB]

Radiotherapy is used with chemotherapy to reduce the number of cancer cells, which could be circulating around your body and to shrink your cancer prior to radiotherapy. This leaflet covers what happens when you’re receiving both treatments for sarcoma.

Consultation with a fertility doctor [Word, 162 KB]

Your breast care nurse, breast surgeon or doctor will have already told you that some treatments for breast cancer are likely to affect your ability to have children naturally (your fertility). Because of this you have been offered a consultation with a specialist fertility doctor at St Mary’s Hospital.

Contrast Enema [Word, 97 KB]

In a contrast enema, contrast dye is injected through a tube and series of X-rays are performed to examine your lower bowel.

Cortisol day curve [PDF, 103 KB]

This is an information sheet about the coristol day curve to check how much cortisol a body is producing.

CT colonography scan [PDF, 85 KB]

This information tells you about CT colonography. This is a test to look inside your abdomen and bowel for any abnormality. This leaflet explains how the test is done, the risks involved and what to expect.

Cystectomy and Anterior Pelvic Clearance for women [PDF, 154 KB]

Cystectomy is the medical term for removal of the bladder. Cystectomy is sometimes referred to as a radical cystectomy or may be a component of a larger operation called an anterior pelvic clearance where additional structures are removed.

Cystectomy for men [PDF, 195 KB]

Cystectomy is sometimes referred to as a radical cystectomy, a cystoprostatectomy or a cystourethrectomy. A cystectomy and a radical cystectomy involve the removal of the entire bladder and the prostate gland (see diagram below). A cystourethrectomy involves the removal of the bladder, prostate and urethra (water pipe).

Cystogram [PDF, 110 KB]

This leaflet tells you about the procedure known as a cystogram. It explains what is involved and what the benefits and risks are. It may make you think of things you would like to discuss with your doctor.

Day-to-day pathway for colorectal and peritoneal oncology centre patients [Word, 212 KB]

The following information describes the pathway when you come to The Christie for surgery for a peritoneal tumour beginning with the visit to the pre-operative assessment clinic, admission to the ward, what happens on the day of surgery, on the oncology critical care unit, return to the ward and going home.

Having a colonoscopy [PDF, 607 KB]

Your doctor or nurse practitioner has recommended that you have a colonoscopy. This is a procedure to look at the lining of your large bowel.

How to give a compliment, raise concerns or make a complaint [PDF, 277 KB]

At The Christie, we welcome any feedback that you can give us – good or bad – about any aspect of your contact with the hospital. We need to know if we are not providing you or your relative or friend with a good service. We also like to know when we are getting things right.

You can also read this information in an accessible format on our Patient Advice and Liaison Service (PALS) page.

Information about your cardiac scan [PDF, 143 KB]

A cardiac scan or cardiac ventriculography is used to evaluate the function and efficiency of your heart, especially the left ventricle which pumps blood around your body. It provides moving images of the blood flow through the heart which we can see on a gamma camera.

Information for patients about carbapenemase-producing enterobacteriaceae (CPE) screening [PDF, 101 KB]

Enterobacteriaceae are bacteria that usually live harmlessly in the gut of humans. However, if the bacteria get into the wrong place, such as the bladder or bloodstream, they can cause infection.

Information for patients with Clostridium difficile infection [PDF, 106 KB]

Clostridium difficile (also known as C.diff, CDI), is a bacterium that can cause infections in the bowel. The symptoms include abdominal pain, diarrhoea, and sometimes fever.

Information on central venous catheters [Word, 322, KB]

This advice for district nurses covers what you need to know if your patient has had a tunnelled central venous catheter (Hickman® line) inserted recently, and what care you’ll need to give.

Managing anxiety about COVID-19 [PDF, 156 KB]

We are being asked to take unusual measures to reduce the rate at which COVID-19 spreads in the population. A near-constant stream of news reports about an outbreak can cause anyone to feel threatened.

Use of the CADD Solis VIP pump at home [PDF, 530 KB]

The CADD Solis pump is an electronic pump designed to administer your treatment whilst you are at home. You may also have a Baxter infusor pump attached containing normal saline to ensure your line doesn’t block between treatments. This leaflet covers how the machine works and how to deal with any alarms that might go off.

D

A guide to understanding delirium [PDF, 109 KB]

Delirium is a state of mental confusion that can happen if you become unwell. It is also known as an ‘acute confusional state’. This leaflet covers the symptoms of delirium and explains who is most at risk of developing the state.

Deep Inspiration Breath Hold (DIBH) using Surface Guided Radiotherapy (SGRT) [PDF, 179 KB]

This leaflet is for patients who have been offered radiotherapy using Deep Inspiration Breath hold technique (DIBH) and Surface guided Radiotherapy (SGRT).

Dermatofibrosarcoma Protuberans (DFSP) [PDF, 104 KB]

DFSP is a rare type of skin cancer which usually occurs on the torso of the body (chest and shoulders) but it can occur on the limbs, head and neck. It develops in the dermis which is the second layer of skin and its cause is unknown.

Dietary advice and Pseudomyxoma Peritonei (PMP) [PDF, 139 KB]

This information is for patients with pseudomyxoma peritonei (PMP). A common problem caused by PMP is a change in bowel habit due to the disease pressing on the bowel which can prevent the absorption of food. You may need to change your diet to make sure you are getting sufficient nutrition.

You can also read this information in an accessible format on our Dietary advice and pseudomyxoma peritonei (PMP) page.

Dietary advice: reducing bowel gas during radiotherapy [PDF, 102 KB]

This leaflet provides advice to patients on how to reduce gas in the bowel during treatment with radiotherapy and a diary chart to complete.

Dietary advice: reducing diarrhoea during radiotherapy [PDF, 103 KB]

This leaflet provides advice to patients on how to cope with diarrhoea during treatment with diarrhoea and a diary chart to complete.

Donating bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cells [PDF, 99 KB]

This information is written to guide you through each stage of the stem cell or bone marrow donation process. The clinical apheresis unit forms part of the haematology and transplant day unit and is run by specially trained nurses who will co-ordinate and carry out your stem cell collection.

Driving when taking strong painkillers and other sedating medicines [PDF, 110 KB]

Many medications prescribed or bought over the counter can make you feel drowsy. The current law says you should not be behind the wheel of a vehicle if you feel sleepy or unable to concentrate due to the influence of any drugs, whether prescribed or not.

DVLA driving regulations: primary brain and spinal cord tumours [PDF, 115 KB]

Read the regulations about driving licences and find out what you must do when you have been diagnosed with a central nervous system tumour.

You can also read this information in an accessible format on our DVLA driving regulations: primary brain and spinal cord tumours page.

Information for patients referred for duodenal stent insertion [PDF, 563 KB]

This leaflet tells you about having a duodenal stent. It explains what is involved before and after insertion, including the benefits, risks and dietary advice. It may make you think of things you would like to discuss with your doctor.

E

Eating well with diabetes when you have a poor appetite [PDF, 933 KB]

This booklet is designed for patients with diabetes and their relatives who have concerns regarding eating and drinking. It offers advice on ways to alter your diet at a time when you may be concerned about losing your appetite or losing weight. Difficulties with eating are often associated with the disease or the side effects of treatment.

Eating well: Living with and beyond cancer [PDF, 2,413 KB]

If you have a healthy weight and a good appetite, follow the advice in this booklet. This booklet offers advice on eating a varied and healthy diet during and after cancer treatment.

Eating – help yourself [PDF, 1,225 KB]

This booklet offers advice on ways to alter your diet at a time when you are concerned about loss of appetite, losing weight or because of eating difficulties. This may be because of your disease or because of the side effects of treatment.

Eating can be a problem when you feel unwell. It may be hard to be enthusiastic about preparing food or eating it. For people having treatment with chemotherapy or radiotherapy, it can be even more of a problem.

You can also read this information in an accessible format on our Eating – help yourself during cancer treatment.

Effentora tablets® [PDF, 112 KB]

Effentora® is used to treat breakthrough pain (a temporary flare in pain) related to cancer. The possible benefits of treatment vary; your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist will be happy to answer any questions you have about your treatment. 

This should be read with the manufacturer’s patient information leaflet.

Embolisation [PDF, 112 KB]

This leaflet tells you about the procedure known as embolisation. It explains what is involved and what the benefits and risks are. It may help you to think of things that you would like to discuss with your doctor.

Enhanced Recovery Programme (ERP) patient diary [PDF, 620 KB]

This diary will give you some reminders of the aims of the enhanced recovery programme. It will also give you the opportunity to comment on how you are feeling during your stay in hospital.

Entonox – Pain control for acute pain [PDF, 109 KB]

Entonox is a well-established pain-relieving gas mixture. It consists of two gases, 50% nitrous oxide and 50% oxygen. It is self-administered, giving you complete control over the timing of the pain relief.

Exchange of a nephrostomy tube [PDF, 110 KB]

This leaflet will tell you about exchange of a nephrostomy tube. It explains what is involved and any risks that may be associated with the procedure.

You can also read this information in an accessible format on our Exchange of a nephrostomy tube page.

Excision of a skin lesion under local anaesthesia [PDF, 111 KB]

Many skin lesions are removed in a small operation done under local anaesthesia. This means that the area surrounding the lesion is numbed (anaesthetised) so that you do not feel any pain during surgery.

Exercise and relaxation programme following an allogeneic stem cell transplant [PDF, 100 KB]

This leaflet covers the 6-week programme consisting of exercises and relaxation, designed to improve physical and mental wellbeing after an allogeneic stem cell transplant.

Exercise classes for people having axillary node clearance [Word, 119 KB]

Your shoulder can become stiff or uncomfortable due to treatment. Doing these exercises will help prevent or minimise stiffness and discomfort.

Exercises for patients having radiotherapy to the shoulder and chest wall [PDF, 713 KB]

Radiotherapy is an important part of the modern treatment of cancer. Generally, the treatment is effective and safe. However, some patients may develop discomfort or stiffness around the shoulder. This booklet gives some exercises you should do if you’re having radiotherapy to your shoulder or chest wall.

Information for patients about E. coli [PDF, 100 KB]

Because E. coli colonises the gut as part of the natural bacteria, it is easy for you to become infected with E. coli, especially if you have open channels such as catheters, lines or wounds; or you are immunosuppressed.

Treatment of Ewing sarcoma at The Christie with irinotecan and temozolomide [PDF, 68 KB]

This information is for patients who are being treated in the medical oncology sarcoma clinic at The Christie for advanced Ewing sarcoma. This leaflet aims to cover the same information discussed in the clinic and will help you remember what was said.

Treatment of Ewing sarcoma at The Christie: Patient Care Plan Information [Word, 185 KB]

This information is for patients who are being treated in The Christie Medical Oncology Sarcoma Clinic for Ewing sarcoma. This leaflet will hopefully cover the same information discussed in the clinic and will help you remember what was said.

Using Efudix cream [PDF, 112 KB]

Efudix is a cream containing an anti-cancer drug (5-Fluorouracil or 5-FU) that is useful in the treatment of some very thin skin cancers and certain other abnormalities.

F

Examination of the bladder under local anaesthetic (flexible cystoscopy) [PDF, 111 KB]

This information tells you about what happens when you come for a flexible cystoscopy (examination of the bladder) under a local anaesthetic. A cystoscopy is an examination that allows the doctor to directly inspect both the water passage and bladder. The instrument used is called a cystoscopy which is a telescope using a fibre optic light source.

Fasting blood test [PDF, 102 KB]

This is an information sheet about what a patient should expect when attending for a fasting blood test.

Fasting gut hormones [PDF, 103 KB]

This is an information sheet about what patients should expect when attending for a blood test to assess fasting gut hormone levels.

Fasting instructions [PDF, 135 KB]

To fully prepare for your admission to hospital, it is important that you read this leaflet carefully. Failure to adhere to the guidelines could make your anaesthetic very dangerous and result in your operation being cancelled on the day.

Fertility referral information for women with a lymphoma diagnosis [PDF, 113 KB]

Your lymphoma doctor or nurse will have already told you that some treatments for lymphoma may affect your ability to have children naturally (your fertility). Because of this you have been offered a consultation with a specialist fertility doctor at St Mary's Hospital.

Fibreoptic Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing (FEES) [PDF, 172 KB]

You have been given an appointment for a FEES. This is an assessment of your swallowing and is carried out by the speech and language therapist. This sheet gives you more information about the examination.

Flow rate and bladder scan [PDF, 110 KB]

This leaflet tells you about what happens when you have a flow rate and bladder scan. A flow rate test is a very simple procedure to measure the rate and volume at which you pass your urine. The test will help the doctor to diagnose what your problem is.

For patients attending for procedures under general anaesthetic [PDF, 110 KB]

We hope you will be comfortable during your visit to the integrated procedures unit and that this leaflet will help you plan your stay. Our aim is to provide the best possible care and to ensure that your stay with us runs smoothly. The staff are here to help and if you need any help, please ask.

For patients attending for procedures under local anaesthetic [PDF, 108 KB]

We hope you will be comfortable during your visit to the integrated procedures unit. Our aim is to provide the best possible care and to ensure that your stay with us runs smoothly. The staff are here to help. If you need any help, please ask.

Having a flexible sigmoidoscopy [PDF, 1,039 KB]

Your doctor or nurse practitioner has recommended that you have a flexible sigmoidoscopy. This is a procedure to look at the lining of your lower bowel.

Ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration (FNA) [PDF, 111 KB]

This leaflet tells you about the procedure known as fine needle aspiration (FNA). It explains what is involved and what the benefits and risks are.

G

Discharge information (Gynaecology) [Word, 154 KB]

You have now been discharged from further arranged follow-up by the clinical oncology team at The Christie. Occasionally after discharge from follow-up, symptoms can develop that you may find worrying. This leaflet is to help you know what to look out for and who to contact if needed.

Gastrostomy tube insertion [PDF, 117 KB]

This leaflet tells you about the procedure known as gastrostomy tube insertion. It explains what is involved and what the risks and benefits are. It may make you think of things you would like to discuss with your doctor.

Genetic testing for ovarian and breast cancer [PDF, 110 KB]

This information leaflet is intended to help women with ovarian cancer understand some of the issues around genetic testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes.

Genotropin® to Omnitrope® switch [PDF, 108 KB]

You are currently receiving Genotropin®. This is a brand name for the drug somatropin (growth hormone). The Endocrinology team is looking at switching to a different brand of somatropin called Omnitrope®. There should be no difference in the effectiveness of the drug but it does significantly reduce the cost to the NHS of this treatment.

Getting active after cancer [PDF, 103 KB]

Getting active after your cancer journey has been shown to maintain or improve physical function and psychological well-being. Exercise is a safe and effective way to reduce treatment side effects and potentially reduce the risk or recurrence.

Giving your consent to treatment [Word, 148 KB]

During your care at The Christie, it may be necessary for you to sign a consent form that confirms that you agree to accept the investigation, examination, or treatment that you are being offered.

It is important that you fully understand the possible risks and intended benefits of the proposed procedure or treatment before you give your consent.

Glans resurfacing [PDF, 392 KB]

This information sheet tells you about what happens when you come for a glans resurfacing under a general anaesthetic. It explains what is involved and the benefits and risks. It may make you think of things you would like to discuss with your doctor/s.

Glansectomy: Surgery for cancer of the penis [PDF, 242 KB]

A glansectomy involves the removal of the tissue at the end of the penis called the glans, usually in the area under the foreskin. The operation may make the penis slightly shorter than before the surgery but the basic shape will stay the same.

Glucagon simulation test [PDF, 109 KB]

This is an information sheet about the glucagon stimulation test which checks if your body is producing enough cortisol (the body's natural steroid hormone) and growth hormone.

Goblet cell adenocarcinoma of the appendix [PDF, 118 KB]

Goblet cell adenocarcinoma of the appendix is a rare cancer, occurring in approximately 1 to 2 people per million. The goblet cell adenocarcinomas cover a range of cancers with different types of cells within them.

Going home with a drain [PDF, 177 KB]

If you are clinically well and have a surgical drain, you can still go home. This leaflet will provide the information you need to care for your drain. You will be taught how to look after it on the ward before you are discharged.

Going home with a temporary catheter [PDF, 203 KB]

Many patients will go home with temporary catheter after surgery. Before you are discharged, we will give you all the catheter supplies that you need and explain how to care for your catheter. We will also arrange for a district nurse to contact you at home should you need additional support.

Groin lymph node dissection surgery for penile cancer – 515 [PDF, 338 KB]

This information is for patients who need surgery to remove the lymph nodes in the groin. The operation is called groin lymph node dissection. The surgery is one of the treatments offered to men with cancer of the penis (penile cancer).

Groin or inguinal lymph node dissection [PDF, 114 KB]

This leaflet describes groin on inguinal lymph node dissection. This means removing the lymph nodes or glands from one or both sides of the groin. It is major surgery and is carried out under a general anaesthetic.

Groin or sentinel lymph node surgery for patients with vulval cancer [Word, 111 KB]

This information sheet has been written to answer some of your questions about removal of the lymph nodes in your groin or your sentinel lymph node. You have been given this leaflet because you have a vulval cancer which is greater than 1mm deep.

Growth hormone profile [PDF, 103 KB]

This is an information sheet about the growth hormone profile which assesses how much growth hormone a body is producing. It is used to confirm a diagnosis of acromegaly or is used as a measure of disease activity.

Gynaecology oncology MDT [PDF, 134 KB]

Diagnosing and treating cancer requires a team of experts, called a multidisciplinary team (MDT). Read more about the MDT who are all specialised in gynaecological cancer.

Having a gastroscopy [PDF, 955 KB]

Your doctor has recommended that you have a gastroscopy. This is a procedure using a special tube to look at the lining of your gullet (oesophagus), your stomach and first part of the intestine (duodenum).

Information about your Ga68 PET-CT scan [PDF, 110 KB]

PET-CT (Positron Emission Tomography with Computerised Tomography) is a scanning method that allows us to detect abnormalities in the body.

For this scan we will give you an injection containing a small amount of radioactivity called Ga68 DOTATOC which helps us to identify certain types of tumours arising from the neuroendocrine systems.

Radiotherapy for gynaecological cancers [PDF, 1,539 KB]

This booklet is written for women who are having radiotherapy to the pelvis for gynaecological cancers such as cancer of the womb, cervix or vagina. It describes all possible treatments, and some may not apply to you.

The doctor or nurse clinician will discuss your treatment with you and explain anything you do not understand.

Robotic surgery in gynaecology [PDF, 180 KB]

A camera and specialised instruments are inserted through small cuts in the abdomen (tummy). These are then connected to the specialised arms of the robot.

The specialist gynaecology nursing service [PDF, 102 KB]

Our gynaecology cancer nursing service is offered by a team who have specialist knowledge and skills in both women's health and cancer treatments.

H

Follow-up information after radiotherapy for head and neck cancer [PDF, 148 KB]

This leaflet describes the follow-up procedures following radiotherapy treatment for head and neck cancer. This is a general guide and you may have a slightly different follow-up routine from that described. Please ask your Christie doctor or nurse if you have any questions about your own case.

Haematology nurse-led clinics [PDF, 103 KB]

This is an information sheet about what patients should expect from the haematology service nurse-led clinics.

Hand hygiene information for patients [PDF, 112 KB]

Hand hygiene can protect you from picking up germs on your hands which may cause you harm. Read this leaflet to see how you can keep your hand clean and keep yourself free from infection.

Having a colonoscopy via stoma [PDF, 1,030 KB]

Your doctor or nurse practitioner has recommended that you have a colonoscopy. This is a procedure to look at the lining of your large bowel through your colostomy (stoma). We want to make you as comfortable as possible during your stay. This booklet answers commonly asked questions about colonoscopy.

Having a combined gastroscopy and colonoscopy [PDF, 817 KB]

Your doctor has recommended that you have a gastroscopy and a colonoscopy. This involves 2 procedures, one to look at the lining of your stomach and the second to look at the lining of your large bowel.

Hemianopia [PDF, 144 KB]

This is an information sheet describing hemianopia which is the loss of part of the field of on the same side in both eyes.

HIV testing at The Christie [PDF, 107 KB]

Being HIV positive is an example of an underlying infection which needs to be treated alongside your cancer to get the best results. Undiagnosed HIV lowers immunity and this can affect the outcome of treatment for cancer. We also know that some types of cancer have an increased link with HIV infection.

For this reason your cancer specialist may suggest that you have an HIV screening tests as part of your general tests and investigations that will help build the best plan of care for you.

Home Enteral Feeding Information Pack [PDF, 3,464 KB]

This booklet has been designed by the department of nutrition and dietetics at The Christie to help you care for your feed and feeding tube. The information provided within this pack is in line with current enteral feeding guidelines at The Christie but please be aware local practice may vary.

Home Oxygen Patient Safety Information and Declaration [PDF, 126 KB]

Becoming short of breath can be your body’s way of trying to maintain your oxygen levels, especially after activity. Some people can maintain their oxygen levels more efficiently than others.

The main reason oxygen is given is to correct low oxygen levels, but it can sometimes help to relieve severe breathlessness. Oxygen can also be given to increase your ability to maintain your usual daily activities along with improving your quality of life.

How to give us good feedback, or how to complain: Easy read [PDF 1,123 KB]

At The Christie, we like to know whether you are happy or unhappy with your time at the hospital. You can tell us whether we are getting things right for you or your family or friends, or if we are not getting things right.

Hydrocortisone day curve [PDF, 103 KB]

This is an information sheet about the hydrocortisone day curve to check if a patient is taking the right dose of steroid replacement.

Hysterectomy for Endometrial Cancer [PDF, 589 KB]

This booklet has been written to help answer some of the questions you may have about surgery for endometrial cancer.

Radiotherapy to the head and neck [PDF, 1,479 KB]

This booklet is to tell you about external beam radiotherapy to the head and neck area. If you would like to know about radiotherapy to the brain, please ask the doctor looking after you.

Right hemicolectomy [PDF, 109 KB]

A right hemicolectomy operation is to remove the right-hand portion of the colon (approximately half the colon). This will include the caecum, ascending colon and a portion of the transverse colon. It is necessary to remove this much because of the way the blood supply supports the colon, rather than because the disease has spread.

The Hepato (liver), Pancreas and Biliary tract (HPB) specialist nursing service [PDF, 102 KB]

The HPB nursing service provides a key worker for patients who are referred to The Christie for treatment. Key workers are a point of contact for patients throughout their cancer treatment and follow-up.

You can also read this information in an accessible format on our hepato (liver), pancreas and biliary tract (HPB) specialist nursing service page.

Where to get help [PDF, 417 KB]

People coping with cancer are not always aware of the many helpful services they can call on. This booklet tells you what sort of help there is at The Christie and in your local area.

I

A guide to your IVC filter removal [PDF, 144 KB]

This leaflet tells you about the procedure known as ‘inferior vena cava (IVC) filter removal’.

Imiquimod (Aldara 5%) cream for penile cancer [PDF, 104 KB]

Your doctor has recommended Imiquimod (Aldara 5%) cream as a treatment for your condition. It is a medicine which is used to treat superficial pre-malignant skin conditions which may develop into cancer.

Immunotherapy [PDF, 353 KB]

Immunotherapy is a type of cancer treatment that helps your immune system to fight cancer by improving your body’s immune cells’ natural ability to target cancer cells. Read about this treatment and what will happen if you come to The Christie for immunotherapy.

Infection prevention and control [PDF, 101 KB]

Our overall objective is to promote the health and wellbeing of patients and staff by the surveillance, prevention and control of hospital infection. Read what we do, how you can keep yourself safe from infection in hospital and how to stay safe at home.

Inflatable penile prosthesis [PDF, 124 KB]

An inflatable penile prosthesis (or penile implant) is a medical device which is surgically inserted into the penis, scrotum and tummy through small incisions.

Information about using a vaginal dilator [PDF, 732 KB]

After radiotherapy to the pelvis, you may experience some side effects to the vagina. These can include vaginal dryness, irritation and soreness. Sometimes scar tissue (fibrosis) can form, causing narrowing (atrophy) or shortening (stenosis) of the vaginal walls.

These side effects are unlikely to cause any discomfort whilst undertaking your day-to-day living, however if sexually active or requiring a gynaecological examination they may result in some discomfort and difficulties.

Information about your GFR test [PDF, 110 KB]

GFR stands for Glomerular Filtration Rate. This test shows how well your kidneys are working to filter your blood.

For this test we will give you an injection containing a small amount of radioactivity (called a radioactive tracer) and we will also take 3 blood samples from you. This test allows your kidney function to be accurately measured by showing how quickly the radioactive tracer disappears from your blood.

Information about your procedural sedation and analgesia [PDF, 102 KB]

Procedural sedation and analgesia refers to a combination of medications (given via a cannula) that aim
to help you stay relaxed and comfortable during your procedure. You will have an opportunity to discuss
having sedation with the specialist nurse on the day of your procedure.

You can also read this information in an accessible format on our Information about your procedural sedation and analgesia page.

Information about your referral to The Christie [PDF, 111 KB]

You have been referred from the team at your local hospital to see one of the doctors at The Christie.

The Christie doctors have clinics in several other hospitals around Greater Manchester and Cheshire as well as at The Christie.

Information about your skeletal survey (skeletal X-ray examination) [PDF, 136 KB]

A skeletal survey examination involves taking pictures of different parts of your body using X-rays. The whole examination takes about 45 minutes. You will come to the radiology department at The Christie for this scan.

Information for patients about the importance of hydration [PDF, 101 KB]

Dehydration occurs when the body loses water faster than it can replenish the fluids. Thirst is the body’s natural response to dehydration. However, this is far less effective in older people and people who have had a stroke or who are suffering from Alzheimer’s disease can be particularly insensitive to thirst.

Infrapubic inflatable penile prosthesis [PDF, 136 KB]

The insertion of an inflatable penile prosthesis is reserved for patients who have tried all other options to regain their erections, but they have failed, or treatments have been unacceptable. It is also used in patients with Peyronie’s disease, and priapism.

Instillagel - information for patients [PDF, 104 KB]

You have been prescribed Instillagel to use due to pain or discomfort. This may be because of the cancer itself, or due to side effects of your radiotherapy treatment.

Instructions for taking PLENVU® bowel preparation [PDF, 82 KB]

If you have been prescribed PLENVU® bowel preparation, it is important to follow these instructions carefully to ensure that you take this bowel preparation in a safe manner and also have a clear bowel so that good views are obtained during your test.

You can also read this information in an accessible format on our Instructions for taking PLENVU® bowel preparation page.

Instructions for taking PLENVU® bowel preparation – prior to surgery [PDF, 77 KB]

If you have been prescribed PLENVU® bowel preparation before you have surgery, it is important to follow these instructions carefully to ensure that you take this bowel preparation in a safe manner and also have a clear bowel so that good views are obtained during your test.

You can also read this information in an accessible format on our Instructions for taking PLENVU® bowel preparation – prior to surgery page.

Insulin tolerance test [PDF, 110 KB]

This is an information sheet about the insulin tolerance test which checks if a body is producing enough cortisol and growth hormone.

Internal organ biopsy [PDF, 143 KB]

A biopsy is a procedure where a small piece of tissue is taken from the body. This can then be looked at under a microscope to tell what kind of cells are in the tissue.

Biopsies can be done using ultrasound or computed tomography (CT). Ultrasound uses sound waves, and CT uses X-rays, to look at tissues inside the body. The radiologist (radiology doctor) doing the biopsy will decide on the most appropriate method and use it to guide a needle into the right place to take a sample.

K

Kerato acanthoma [PDF, 103 KB]

Kerato acanthoma (KA) is a skin lesion that develops on sun-exposed areas such as the face, forearms, back of hands and lower leg. It affects the middle-aged, elderly, and mostly white-skinned people. It is also common in people whose immune system is not working as well as usual due to drugs or diseases.

Ketamine [PDF, 1,207 KB]

This leaflet provides information on a medicine called ketamine which is used to treat pain that is difficult to control. It is offered as a guide to you and your family.

Ketorolac injection [PDF, 115 KB]

This leaflet provides information on a medicine called ketorolac which is used to treat pain that is difficult to control. It is offered as a guide to you and your family. The possible benefits of treatment vary; your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist will be happy to answer any questions you have about your treatment.

Ultrasound guided biopsy of the kidney [PDF, 116 KB]

This leaflet tells you about the procedure known as an ultrasound guided biopsy of the kidney. It explains what is involved and what the benefits and risks are. It may make you think of things you would like to discuss further with your doctor.

L

Follow-up arrangements after radiotherapy to the larynx (voice box): The Christie at Oldham [PDF, 181 KB]

You will usually be followed up in the oncology clinic 6 weeks after completing radiotherapy. We will arrange your appointment and send you an appointment letter.

Going home after your latissimus dorsi with implant [PDF, 115 KB]

When you are discharged you may be referred to your district nurse to check the wounds and dressings. We will also give you a hospital appointment to attend to check your wounds.

Information about the learning from deaths process at The Christie [PDF, 133 KB]

All NHS trusts routinely carry out a review of the case notes of a proportion of patients who die in their care. This helps NHS trusts continue to learn and improve the care they provide.

Information for laryngectomy patients having radiotherapy [PDF, 115 KB]

Many of the side effects you will experience during your radiotherapy are described in the booklet ‘Information for patients having radiotherapy to the head and neck’.

However, there are some important side effects that apply only to people who have had a laryngectomy. These side effects are usually due to the radiotherapy and will normally settle down in the weeks after the treatment.

Laparoscopic Hysterectomy for Endometrial Cancer [PDF, 577 KB]

This booklet has been written to help answer some of the questions you may have about surgery for endometrial cancer. This operation may be carried out using key-hole surgery.

Laparoscopic Radical Hysterectomy [PDF, 568 KB]

This booklet has been written to help answer some of the questions you may have about laparoscopic radical hysterectomy.

Women with cancer of the cervix (neck of the womb) or uterus (womb) may be offered a radical hysterectomy. This is different from a ‘simple’ hysterectomy because not only are the cervix, uterus and fallopian tubes removed, but also the top 2 to 3 cm of the vagina and the tissues around the cervix. This operation may be carried out using key-hole surgery.

Laparoscopic surgery for colon and rectal cancer [Word, 130 KB]

Laparoscopic or key-hole surgery is carried out using a “telescope” called a laparoscope. A laparoscope is inserted through a small cut into the body.

Lidocaine 5% plaster (Versatis® medicated plaster) [PDF, 115 KB]

This leaflet provides information on a medicine called lidocaine which is used to treat pain in palliative care and supportive care patients. It is offered as a guide to you and your family. The possible benefits of treatment vary; your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist will be happy to answer any questions you have about your treatment.

Linogram [PDF, 109 KB]

This leaflet tells you about the procedure known as a linogram. It explains what is involved and what the benefits and risks are. It may make you think of things you would like to discuss with your doctor.

Loopogram [PDF, 109 KB]

This leaflet tells you about the procedure known as a loopogram. It explains what is involved and what the benefits and risks are. It may make you think of things you would like to discuss with your doctor.

Low grade appendiceal mucinous neoplasm (LAMN II) [PDF, 100 KB]

A low grade appendiceal mucinous neoplasm is a growth found in your appendix. If this pushes through the appendix wall, this is called a LAMN II. We offer a specialised operation called cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) to treat this.

You can also read this information in an accessible format on our Low grade appendiceal mucinous neoplasm (LAMN II) page.

Low grade mucinous neoplasm I (LAMN I) [PDF, 114 KB]

A low-grade mucinous neoplasm (LAMN I) is a growth found in your appendix. We use this term when the growth is very early and has not spread anywhere.

You can also read this information in an accessible format on our Low grade mucinous neoplasm I (LAMN I) page.

Lymphoma clinical nurse specialist service [PDF, 101 KB]

Read about the services that the lymphoma clinical nurse specialists offer, and who your lymphoma clinical nurse specialists are.

Radiotherapy to the lung [PDF, 1,929 KB]

This booklet is to tell you about external beam radiotherapy to the lung. The Christie is a specialised centre for radiotherapy and patients come for treatments that are not always available at general hospitals.

You can also read this information in an accessible format on our Radiotherapy to the lung page.

Taking part in a lymphoma clinical trial [PDF, 102 KB]

The lymphoma research team are an experienced team of cancer doctors and nurses who specialise in the delivery of clinical trials of Hodgkin lymphoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. They provide access to over 30 different clinical trials. This leaflet covers who they are, when you’ll meet them and how to contact them.

Ultrasound guided biopsy of the liver [PDF, 116 KB]

This leaflet tells you about the procedure known as an ultrasound guided biopsy of the liver. It explains what is involved and what the benefits and risks are. It may make you think of things you would like to discuss further with your doctor.

M

Going home after a mastectomy and dermal flap with implant [PDF, 115 KB]

When you are discharged you may be referred to your district nurse to check the wounds and dressings. We will also give you a hospital appointment to attend to check your wounds.

How to use micro-enemas [PDF, 101 KB]

You have been prescribed micro-enemas to use before your radiotherapy planning scan, and daily before each radiotherapy treatment, to empty your rectum. This allows us to be more accurate in delivering your radiotherapy and reduce the amount of your rectum that we treat. Research has shown that it is beneficial and generally has no serious side effects.

Information about your mIBG scan [PDF, 111 KB]

This scan is used to detect certain types of tumours called neuro-endocrine tumours. This examination is performed over 2 days.

On the first day we will give you an injection of a tracer called mIBG which contains a small amount of a radioactive material. 4 hours after this we will take the first set of pictures. You will then need to return on the second day and we will take further more detailed pictures.

Information about your MRI contrast/dye [PDF, 112 KB]

You have been given an injection of MRI contrast/dye to help highlight the area of interest on your magnetic resonance scan. This leaflet covers the potential reactions to this injection you’ll need to watch out for.

Information for patients about MRSA screening [PDF, 101 KB]

MRSA stands for Meticillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus. If it spreads to a wound or into your body through a break in the skin, it can cause an infection which is then difficult to treat. All patients will be routinely screened at or prior to a planned admission or procedure.

Information for patients about MRSA treatment prior to line insertion [PDF, 63 KB]

This leaflet explains what MRSA is and contains contact details should you require further advice.

Information for patients with MRSA [PDF, 101 KB]

MRSA stands for Meticillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus. Staphylococcus Aureus is a bacterium or germ found on about a third of the population, especially in the nose and throat and on the skin.

Instructions for taking Moviprep bowel preparation [PDF, 79 KB]

You have been prescribed an oral bowel cleansing agent which is also known as bowel preparation. It is important to follow these instructions carefully to ensure that you take this bowel preparation in a safe manner and have a clear bowel so that good views are obtained during your test.

You can also read this information in an accessible format on our Instructions for taking Moviprep bowel preparation page.

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) [PDF, 259 KB]

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) combines a powerful magnet and radio waves with a computer to produce pictures of any part of the body. The detail in these pictures allows the doctor to see soft tissues such as muscle, fat and internal organs as well as bone. This scan does not use X-rays.

Malleable (semi-rigid) penile prosthesis [PDF, 218 KB]

The insertion of a malleable penile prosthesis is reserved for patients who have tried all other options to regain their erections but they have not worked or have found them unacceptable. It is also used in patients with Peyronie’s disease, priapism and incontinence. A malleable penile prosthesis allows patients to have a firm erection so that they can continue having a sex life.

Meatal dilatation [PDF, 136 KB]

This operation been discussed with you by your urologist because there is a narrowing in the water passage (urethra) through which the urine drains out of your bladder. The benefit of doing the procedure is to allow a better flow of urine from the bladder.

Medical tattooing [PDF, 109 KB]

We use tattoos to create the image of an areola and nipple for women who have had breast reconstruction and to camouflage some scars. The tattoos are applied with a small electric machine which holds needles that make tiny holes in the surface of the skin to allow the semi-permanent dye to create shading.

You can also read this information in an accessible format on our Medical tattooing page.

Methadone [PDF, 112 KB]

Methadone is used to treat pain that is difficult to control. The possible benefits of treatment vary; your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist will be happy to answer any questions you have about your treatment. We may be recommending this medicine to be used for a condition it was not originally designed for, so you may find that there are some differences between the hospital and the manufacturer’s information.

Mouth care during radiotherapy to the head and neck [PDF, 103 KB]

It is very important to keep your mouth clean during radiotherapy to the mouth or throat. This leaflet gives advice on mouthwashes you can use to help prevent soreness or infection, and so you can still eat and drink.

Multi drug resistant organisms (MDRO) [PDF, 101 KB]

MDRO are bacteria (or germs) that are resistant to at least three different antibiotics. MDRO refers to common organisms such as Escherichia coli, Acineobacter baumanii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other organisms that have become resistant to 3 or more antibiotics.

MyChristie-MyHealth [PDF, 151 KB]

This is a guide for people who have lung cancer and are currently having treatment or had treatment in the past. The guide gives advice on how to manage some of the common symptoms at home.

Please note that this information does not replace medical care. Seek medical advice if you feel unwell in any way or are concerned about your symptoms.

Patient record – Mitomycin-C and 5-Flourouracil: For outpatient chemotherapy and radiotherapy for anal cancer [PDF, 65 KB]

This is a patient record document for people receiving Mitomycin-C and 5-Flourouracil as outpatient chemotherapy and who are receiving radiotherapy for anal cancer. You can use it to track what you need to do each day.

Patient record – Mitomycin-C and Capecitabine: For outpatient chemotherapy and radiotherapy for anal cancer [PDF, 61 KB]

This is a patient record document for people receiving Mitomycin-C and Capecitabine as outpatient chemotherapy and who are receiving radiotherapy for anal cancer. You can use it to track your treatment each day you’re in The Christie.

Services available through the Macmillan cancer information and support centre (MCISC) at The Christie at Oldham [PDF, 102 KB]

The Macmillan cancer information and support centre is next to the café, at the side of reception in The Christie at Oldham. Please call in to ask any questions, to pick up information or just to have a chat. If there is no one available to talk to you or if you just want to leave a comment or ask a question - fill in a card and drop it in the white post box on the cupboard by the office door in the information centre.

Services available through the Macmillan cancer information and support centre (MCISC) at The Christie at Salford [PDF, 102 KB]

At The Christie at Salford, you will find the MCISC on your right as you walk in, just before the reception desk. Please call in to ask any questions, to pick up information or just to have a chat.

N

Guidelines for Management of Nephrostomy Tubes [PDF, 74 KB]

This advice for district nurses covers what you need to know if your patient has had a percutaneous nephrostomy tube inserted recently to allow urine to drain from an obstructed kidney, and what you’ll need to look out for.

Naloxegol (Moventig®) [PDF, 115 KB]

This leaflet provides information on a medicine called naloxegol which is used to treat constipation in palliative care and supportive care patients. It is offered as a guide to you and your family. The possible benefits of treatment vary; your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist will be happy to answer any questions you have about your treatment.

Nasogastric tube insertion [Word, 102 KB]

Your medical team has recommended that you have a nasogastric tube inserted. This is a tube that either enables you to be fed directly into your stomach or allows nursing staff to remove excess stomach contents that could be making you feel nauseous.

Nipple reconstruction [PDF, 109 KB]

As part of the treatment of breast cancer, the whole breast may be removed including the nipple and areola (the darker flat circular area surrounding the nipple). During reconstruction, the breast mound is created first.

About 3 to 4 months after the wounds have healed and when the shape of the reconstructed breast has settled, the nipple and areola complex can be reconstructed.

You can also read this information in an accessible format on our Nipple reconstruction page.

Non-seminomatous Germ Cell Tumour (NSGCT): Stage 1 disease [Word, 85 KB]

You have recently had an operation called an ‘orchidectomy’ (removal of a testicle) which has confirmed a diagnosis of testicular cancer.  This information explains what happens next.

Nurse led adjuvant HER2 therapy team [PDF, 100 KB]

The adjuvant HER2 therapy team at The Christie is a nurse led service with specialised knowledge and skills in the care and support of patients receiving treatment with HER2 therapies such as trastuzumab, pertuzumab, Phesgo or Kadcyla.

Nutrition advice during cancer treatment [PDF, 112 KB]

Do you need a little extra help and guidance about nutrition and what to eat whilst undertaking cancer treatment? Find out about the information available to help you with easy ways to maintain a healthy diet.

Nutritional products: availability of nutritional drinks, powders and puddings [PDF, 326 KB]

Many special nutritional products are available if eating or maintaining your weight is difficult. Lots of choice means it can be hard to decide what is right for you. This booklet has been designed by The Christie dietitians and covers what’s available, and how to work out what’s right for you.

Surgery for small bowel neuroendocrine tumours [PDF, 129 KB]

Small bowel neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) are rare bowel tumours. They start in the neuroendocrine cells of the small bowel. They often develop slowly and don’t always have specific symptoms.

The neuroendocrine tumour (NET) specialist nursing service at The Christie [PDF, 102 KB]

The clinical nurse specialists (CNS) within the NET team act as key workers for patients and provide a point of contact for patients who are undergoing neuroendocrine cancer treatment at The Christie. They provide a link between patients and the oncology team, and a link between the hospital and other health care professionals, such as the GP.

You can also read this information in an accessible format on our neuroendocrine tumour (NET) specialist nursing service page.

O

Information about your octreotide scan [PDF, 111 KB]

This scan is used to detect certain types of tumours arising from the neuro-endocrine systems of the body. This examination is performed over 2 days.

Information for patients referred for oesophageal stent insertion [PDF, 258 KB]

This leaflet tells you about having an oesophageal stent. It explains what is involved before and after insertion, including the benefits, risks and dietary advice. It may make you think of things you would like to discuss with your doctor.

Occupational therapy and cancer-related fatigue [Word, 192 KB]

As many as three quarters of people with cancer feel fatigued at some time. Cancer-related fatigue may be due to the cancer itself or may be a result of symptoms caused by the cancer. It can also be a side effect of treatment. Read how you can cope with fatigue if you’re having cancer treatment.

Octreotide injection [PDF, 113 KB]

Octreotide is used within supportive and palliative care to reduce symptoms from bowel obstruction, or high output of fluid from an ileostomy or a fistula. The possible benefits of treatment vary; your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist will be happy to answer any questions you have about your treatment.

Oesophageal dilatation [Word, 113 KB]

The medical team caring for you is concerned that you are having problems in swallowing. This may be due to a narrowing or a blockage in your oesophagus (gullet). To make sure that you are getting adequate nutrition and can swallow effectively, your medical team has referred you for an oesophageal dilatation (widening of the gullet).

Oncology Critical Care Unit [PDF, 134 KB]

A patient may be admitted to the Oncology Critical Care Unit (OCCU) because of an illness, for additional supportive treatment, or after a major operation for observations. This can be a worrying time, so this leaflet is designed to help you access the necessary information.

Oral glucose tolerance test [PDF, 103 KB]

This is an information sheet about the glucose tolerance test which assesses growth hormone levels.

Radiotherapy to the oesophagus [PDF, 436 KB]

This booklet is to tell you about radiotherapy to the oesophagus. The Christie is a specialised centre for radiotherapy and patients come for treatments that are not always available at general hospitals. You may have heard about radiotherapy from people you know or from the patients at The Christie. Remember that their information may not apply to you.

Surgery for ovarian mass [PDF, 583 KB]

Your doctor has told you that you have an ovarian mass, tumour or cyst on one or both of your ovaries. The doctor may have said that he/she is concerned about the results of the investigations and that the ovary needs to be removed to see if there is any cancer present.

You can also read this information in an accessible format on our Surgery for ovarian mass page.

P

A guide to taking pancreatic enzymes (Creon) [Word, 333 KB]

If your pancreas has been damaged by disease, or if you have had surgery to this gland, it may be unable to produce certain enzymes, which are needed to help you to digest your food.

Cancer of the penis (penile cancer) [PDF, 112 KB]

Penile cancer is a rare cancer. The exact cause of the disease is not known. However, there are some factors which appear to increase risk of the disease.

You can also read this information in an accessible format on our Penile cancer page.

Care of your peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) [PDF, 921 KB]

A PICC is a peripherally inserted central catheter. It is a thin flexible tube that is inserted into a vein in the upper arm. This booklet covers the benefits of a PICC, how one is inserted and what you need to know if you have a PICC.

Going home after permanent implants [PDF, 111 KB]

When you are discharged you may be referred to your district nurse to check the wounds and dressings. We will also give you a hospital appointment to attend to check your wounds.

Helping to prevent pressure ulcers [PDF, 113 KB]

You have been identified as being at risk of developing a pressure ulcer. Pressure ulcers can take a long time to heal and may mean that you have to stay in hospital for some time.

High dose rate prostate brachytherapy (HDR) [PDF, 1,309 KB]

Your oncologist or specialist doctor has recommended that you may benefit from high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR). This information booklet aims to tell you about this treatment.

Information about your parathyroid scan [PDF, 109 KB]

A parathyroid scan is used to examine how your parathyroid glands are working. It can also identify parathyroid tissue away from its normal position in the neck. For this scan we will administer two different tracers, each containing a small amount of radioactivity.

Information about your PET-CT scan [PDF, 111 KB]

PET-CT (positron emission tomography with computerised tomography) is a scanning method that allows us to see how organs are working and helps us identify abnormalities in the body. For this scan we will give you an injection containing a small amount of radioactivity called a tracer.

Information for flushing and dressing an open-ended (PICC) [Word, 329 KB]

This advice for district nurses covers what you need to know if your patient has had an open-ended peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) inserted recently, and what you’ll need to look out for.

Palatine ambulatory care unit: A guide for haematology and TYA patients [PDF, 1,106 KB]

This information booklet has been designed to provide an overview for patients and carers (or companions) about the ambulatory service available as part of the haematology and Teenage and Young Adult (TYA) services at The Christie.

Parenteral nutrition: information for patients [PDF, 110 KB]

Normally when you eat, food is broken down and digested (absorbed) in your digestive tract (known as bowel or gut). Parenteral nutrition (PN), sometimes called total parenteral nutrition (TPN), is a form of liquid food given directly into your blood stream without the need to go into your digestive tract first.

Partial penectomy [PDF, 115 KB]

This information is for patients who have cancer of the penis and need surgery to remove a part of the penis. This is called a partial penectomy.

PecFent® intranasal spray [PDF, 112 KB]

PecFent® is used to treat breakthrough pain (a temporary flare in pain) related to cancer. The possible benefits of treatment vary; your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist will be happy to answer any questions you have about your treatment.

This should be read with the manufacturer’s patient information leaflet.

PeIN (penile intraepithelial neoplasia) [PDF, 104 KB]

PeIN (penile intraepithelial neoplasia) means there are abnormal cells or growths that can look like ulcers or warts on the surface of the skin of the penis. These abnormal cells or growths may become cancerous and spread into nearby normal tissue if not treated.

Percutaneous biliary drainage and stent insertion [PDF, 115 KB]

This leaflet tells you about the procedures known as biliary drainage and stent insertion. It explains what is involved and the benefits and risks. It may make you think of things you would like to discuss with your doctor.

Percutaneous nephrostomy [PDF, 114 KB]

This leaflet tells you about the procedures known as percutaneous nephrostomy. It explains what is involved and the benefits and risks. It may make you think of things you would like to discuss with your doctor.

PET-CT information for diabetic patients [PDF, 103 KB]

When you have a PET/CT scan you are given an injection of a radioactive sugar called 18-F fluorodeoxyglucose (18-F FDG). This special form of glucose is taken up by cells in the body, in the same way as normal glucose, from your blood.

Planned surgery: A guide for patients and their carers [PDF, 1,312 KB]

This booklet provides you with information on having an operation at The Christie. It aims to explain the process of your surgery and answer your questions. Not all the information may be relevant to you, so a member of staff can direct you to the most helpful parts and answer any questions you may have.

Pleural drainage [PDF, 109 KB]

This leaflet tells you about the procedure known as pleural drainage. It explains what is involved and what the benefits and risks are. It may help you think of things you would like to discuss further with your doctor.

Post radiotherapy skin care advice for breast or chest wall treatments, and/or the lymph nodes [PDF, 87 KB]

Now that you have completed your radiotherapy continue to moisturise using the moisturiser you used throughout treatment. If you have not yet used a moisturiser start using an unperfumed one which you know your skin agrees with. If you have a new moisturiser, test it on the back of your hand first to make sure you do not have a reaction to it.

Preload [PDF, 135 KB]

Preload is a neutral-tasting carbohydrate drink designed to provide the body with energy during a period of starvation. Research has shown that your body will recover faster after surgery if you are well hydrated and not in a state of 'starvation'. It can also contribute towards your comfort and reduce thirst.

Premature Ovarian Insufficiency (early menopause) [PDF, 1,427 KB]

This information has been developed by young women who are going through, or who are at high risk of going through, Premature Ovarian Insufficiency (POI) in collaboration with professionals from cancer, endocrinology, gynaecology, menopause and psychological specialities.

Preparing for radiotherapy to the prostate: Oldham [PDF, 136 KB]

Opening your bowels regularly, especially before the planning scan and each daily treatment, means that the shape of your rectum, and the position of your prostate remain consistent. If your rectum is full during treatment, the position of the prostate can change making it difficult to accurately target the radiotherapy.

Prostate brachytherapy: Low dose rate permanent seed implant [PDF, 1,609 KB]

We would like you to be able to use this information as a basis for any questions you may have about prostate brachytherapy as a potential treatment choice for your early-stage prostate cancer.

Prostate easy access support service (PEASS) workbook

This booklet is for any Christie patients attending a PEASS (Prostate Easy Access Support Service) workshop. During and following treatment for prostate cancer, we are encouraging patients who have a stable Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) to self-manage their care with the support of the PEASS team. This workshop will cover all the information you need to do so.

Prostate follow-up at Ashton Primary Care Centre [PDF, 148 KB]

Your after-care following prostate cancer treatment will be delivered at Ashton primary care centre. The clinic is staffed by specialist Christie nurses who have expertise in managing prostate cancer patients.

Prostate follow-up at Beechwood cancer care centre [PDF, 174 KB]

Your after care following prostate cancer treatment will be delivered at Beechwood cancer care centre. The clinic is staffed by specialist Christie nurses who have expertise in managing prostate cancer patients.

Prostate follow-up at Chapel Road clinic [PDF, 155 KB]

Your after-care appointments following prostate cancer treatment will be delivered at Chapel Road clinic in Sale. The clinic is staffed by specialist Christie nurses who have expertise in managing prostate cancer patients.

Prostate follow-up at Hazel Grove Clinic [PDF, 119 KB]

This leaflet will give you information about a follow-up clinic for prostate patients.

Prostate follow-up at The Christie at Oldham [PDF, 233 KB]

Your after-care appointments following prostate cancer treatment will be delivered at The Christie at Oldham – read more about what to expect in this leaflet.

Prostate follow-up at Townside primary care centre [PDF, 169 KB]

Townside is one of the 7 community clinics set up by The Christie for reviewing men who have been treated at The Christie for prostate cancer. The clinic is staffed by specialist nurses from the urology/oncology team who have expertise in managing prostate cancer patients.

Prostate follow-up at Waters Green medical centre [PDF, 173 KB]

Your after-care following prostate cancer treatment will be delivered at Waters Green Medical Centre, Macclesfield. The clinic is staffed by specialist Christie nurses who have expertise in managing prostate cancer patients.

Prostate template biopsy [PDF, 112 KB]

This information tells you what happens when you have a prostate template biopsy. It explains what is involved and the benefits and risks. It may help you to think of things you would like to discuss with your doctor/s.

Protected mealtimes [PDF, 133 KB]

We have introduced protected mealtimes to give patients the opportunity to eat their meals without any interruptions. All visitors will be asked to leave the ward at mealtimes except carers helping with meals.

Proton beam therapy and urology cancer [PDF, 99 KB]

There is a nationally agreed list of possible cancers where proton beam therapy might be useful, mostly in children and young adults. At present, common adult urological cancers such as prostate, bladder and kidney cancer are not part of the approved list.

Proton beam therapy for base of skull chondrosarcoma [PDF, 104 KB]

This is an information sheet about treatment with Proton beam therapy for base of skull chondrosarcoma.

Proton beam therapy for base of skull chordoma [PDF, 104 KB]

This is an information sheet about treatment with Proton beam therapy for base of skull chordoma.

Proton beam therapy – adult /young adult (TYA)

The Christie offers one of only 2 high energy NHS proton beam therapy (PBT) centres in the UK. We provide specialised treatment for UK patients with complex and hard-to-treat cancers. Teenage and young adults will also be assigned a youth support coordinator who can offer practical and emotional support tailored to this age group.

You can also read this information in an accessible format on our Proton beam therapy – adult/young adult (TYA): A guide for patients and their carers page.

Proton beam therapy: Shuttle bus timetable [PDF, 112 KB]

This is the shuttle bus timetable to the proton beam therapy centre at The Christie, for protons patients.

Pseudomyxoma peritonei (PMP) information for patients [PDF, 89 KB]

Pseudomyxoma peritonei (PMP) is a rare, often slow-growing tumour usually starting from the appendix. It produces large amounts of a jelly-like substance (mucus) that collects in the abdomen.

You can also read this information in an accessible format on our Pseudomyxoma peritonei (PMP) page.

Psychosexual medicine and therapy service for gynaecological patients [PDF, 100 KB]

The gynaecological psychosexual service provides support for patients and their partners affected by gynaecological cancers whose sexual function, sexual relationships, intimacy or body image, have been altered by their diagnosis and treatment. It is common for patients to need some support; this may be talking therapy, physical treatments or both.

Radiotherapy to the pelvis for rectal tumours [PDF, 3.63 MB]

This booklet is to tell you about radiotherapy to the pelvis for tumours of the rectum. It describes all possible treatments, and some may not apply to you. The clinical team will discuss your treatment with you and explain anything you do not understand.

You can also read this information in an accessible format on our Radiotherapy to the pelvis for rectal tumours page.

Radiotherapy to the prostate [PDF, 2,263 KB]

This booklet is to tell you about external beam radiotherapy to the prostate. The Christie is a specialised centre for radiotherapy and patients come for treatments that are not always available at general hospitals.

You can also read this information in an accessible format on our Radiotherapy to the prostate page.

The Christie PEASS (prostate easy access support service)

The Christie PEASS is a supported self-management follow-up pathway for patients following their prostate cancer treatment or who are only on hormone therapy treatment.

The psycho-oncology service [PDF, 511 KB]

A diagnosis of cancer can be very difficult. Whilst you have your own personal resilience, perhaps the support of family and friends and that of the nurses and doctors treating you, sometimes you may feel you need some extra help.

We are a specialist team who can support you with coping with the emotional and psychological challenges of having cancer.

Total penectomy [PDF, 115 KB]

This information is for men who have cancer of the penis and who need surgery to remove the entire penis. This is called a total penectomy.

Understanding phase 1 clinical trials [PDF, 1,029 KB]

This leaflet provides information for you, your family and friends to explain what phase 1 clinical trials are and how they are carried out.

Using MyChristie-MyHealth to monitor patients receiving hormone therapy for prostate cancer [PDF, 106 KB]

If you take hormone medication such as abiraterone, apalutamide, darolutamide or enzalutamide for prostate cancer, your clinical team will monitor you during treatment using a service called MyChristie-MyHealth.

You can also read this information in an accessible format on our Using MyChristie-MyHealth to monitor patients receiving hormone therapy for prostate cancer page.

Welcome to the department of plastic surgery (department 4) [PDF, 109 KB]

Your doctor in clinic has told you that you are going to have an operation under the care of the plastic surgery department at The Christie. You will normally be admitted to a ward on the day of surgery. On occasion, you may be admitted on the day before surgery for further preparation to take place.

Welcome to the Palatine ward [Word, 223 KB]

Our ward merges 2 units – the haematology and transplant unit and the young oncology unit. This booklet provides you with information about all aspects of your illness and treatment on the Palatine ward at The Christie.

Q

Qutenza® (Capsaicin) 8% patch [PDF, 105 KB]

Pain is transmitted by nerves so it is often possible to reduce pain by blocking signals from affected nerves. Qutenza® is a patch for use on your skin. It contains a synthetic form of capsaicin. The capsaicin acts on pain-sensing nerves in the skin, making them less sensitive to pain. The effects of Qutenza® can be easily reversed.

R

Information about your radiotherapy planning CT scan: The Christie at Salford [PDF, 105 KB]

A radiotherapy planning scan uses a CT scanner to produce crosssectional images or 'slices' through the body using X-rays linked to a computer. The scans which are undertaken to plan your radiotherapy are solely aimed to give enough information to plan the radiotherapy accurately.

Information about your radium-223 (Xofigo) therapy [PDF, 145 KB]

Your consultant has recommended that you have treatment with radium-223 (Xofigo). Radium therapy can be an effective treatment for reducing pain caused by cancer that has spread to the bone (bone metastases). It is most used in prostate cancer.

My Radiotherapy Journey – Asleep [PDF, 1,579 KB]

This booklet for younger child patients explains what happens when you come to The Christie for radiotherapy and have to go to sleep during your treatment. It’s designed to be read by children and their adults.

My Radiotherapy Journey – Awake [PDF, 2,038 KB]

This booklet for child patients explains what happens when you come to The Christie for radiotherapy. It’s designed to be read by children and their adults.

Radical abdominal trachelectomy [PDF, 133 KB]

A radical trachelectomy is an operation to treat cervical cancer. It may be offered to women who wish to keep their womb (uterus) because they still wish to have children.

Radical hysterectomy [PDF, 581 KB]

This booklet has been written to help answer some of the questions you may have about radical hysterectomy. This is different from a ‘simple’ hysterectomy because not only are the cervix, uterus and fallopian tubes removed, but also the top 2 to 3 cm of the vagina and the tissues around the cervix.

Radical trachelectomy [PDF, 576 KB]

This booklet has been written to help answer some of the questions you may have about radical trachelectomy. A radical trachelectomy is an operation to treat cervical cancer. It may be offered to women who wish to keep their womb (uterus), because they still wish to have children.

Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for the treatment of thyroid nodules [PDF, 115 KB]

This leaflet contains information for patients their family and carers, who are considering having radiofrequency ablation (RFA) treatment of a benign (non-cancerous) or cancerous thyroid nodule. It explains what is involved and the possible risks.

Radioiodine treatment for thyrotoxicosis [PDF, 1,344 KB]

Radioiodine can be used to treat people with an overactive thyroid gland or an enlarged thyroid gland. The Christie treats many people with radioiodine for these 2 conditions.

Radiotherapy department scanner - information about your radiotherapy planning CT scan: The Christie at Oldham [PDF, 101 KB]

A radiotherapy planning scan uses a CT scanner to produce crosssectional images or ‘slices’ through the body using X-rays linked to a computer. The scans which are undertaken to plan your radiotherapy are solely aimed to give enough information to plan the radiotherapy accurately.

Radiotherapy for primary brain tumours (including pituitary and base of skull) [PDF, 2,023 KB]

This booklet has been written for patients having radiotherapy to the brain. Radiotherapy is the use of exact, carefully measured doses of radiation to treat disease.

You can also read this information in an accessible format on our radiotherapy for primary brain tumours page.

Radiotherapy for symptom control [PDF, 121 KB]

You have been recommended a short course of radiotherapy by your consultant. The radiotherapy treatment is designed to control specific symptoms and problems, reducing the need for medications and enabling you to do the activities you need and want to do. This is called palliative radiotherapy.

Radiotherapy to the pelvis for anal cancer [PDF, 2.02 MB]

This booklet is to tell you about radiotherapy to the pelvis for cancer of the anus. It describes other possible treatments, some of which may not apply to you.

You can also read this information in an accessible format on our Radiotherapy to the pelvis for anal cancer page.

Radiotherapy: A guide for patients and their carers [PDF, 1.26 MB]

This booklet is to tell you about external beam radiotherapy. The Christie is a specialised centre for radiotherapy, and patients come for treatments that are not available at general hospitals. This is a general introduction to radiotherapy.

Rectal cancer: Clinical Complete Response after chemo-radiotherapy [PDF, 104 KB]

This information sheet can be used alongside information to patients considering chemo-radiotherapy prior to surgery for rectal cancer, and for patients who have completed chemo-radiotherapy and are found to have a Clinical Complete Response on follow-up scans and investigations.

Retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (RPLND) [PDF, 200 KB]

Cancer cells can be carried in the lymph fluid to the lymph nodes where they can grow as “secondary deposits” of cancer. This information describes the operation to remove the residual lymph nodes at the back of the abdomen as part of your treatment for testicular cancer.

Reversal (closure) of loop ileostomy [PDF, 115 KB]

This booklet has been written to provide you with information about reversal (closure) of your ileostomy. This following information will provide details about what the surgery involves, common problems which can be experienced after reversal and how to manage them.

Robot-assisted laparoscopic partial nephrectomy [PDF, 109 KB]

This booklet gives you information about a procedure which uses keyhole surgery to remove part of the kidney using robot assistance. It is called robot-assisted laparoscopic partial nephrectomy.

Robotic Assisted Radical Laparoscopic Prostatectomy (RALP) [PDF, 70 KB]

This leaflet covers some frequently asked postoperative questions, provides contact numbers and a checklist for you to follow.

Robotic pelvic node dissection for penile cancer (unilateral or bilateral) [PDF, 199 KB]

This information sheet tells you about what happens when you come for a robotic pelvic lymph node dissection under general anaesthetic. It explains what is involved and the benefits and risks. It may make you think of things you would like to discuss with your doctor.

Robotic radical prostatectomy [PDF, 220 KB]

This booklet gives you information about a procedure which uses keyhole surgery to remove the prostate using robot assistance. It is called Robot Assisted Laparoscopic Prostatectomy or RALP.

Robotic resections for rectal and anal cancer [Word, 596 KB]

This booklet has been written to provide information on robotic rectal resections which involves keyhole surgery to remove the rectum using robot assistance. The Da Vinci surgical system shown below is a highly sophisticated robotic platform with a console where the surgeon sits and carries out the rectal resection.

S

Radiotherapy to a limb for sarcoma [PDF, 1,450 KB]

This booklet has been written for patients who are about to receive radiotherapy treatment to a limb (arm or leg) for soft tissue sarcoma or bone sarcoma.

Radiotherapy to the pelvis for sarcoma [PDF, 1,155 KB]

This booklet has been written for patients who are about to receive radiotherapy treatment to their pelvis for soft tissue sarcoma or bone sarcoma.

Radiotherapy to the skin [PDF, 2,282 KB]

This booklet has been written for patients having superficial radiotherapy to the skin. Radiotherapy is the use of exact, carefully measured doses of radiation to treat disease.

You can also read this information in an accessible format on our Radiotherapy to the skin page.

Radiotherapy to the spine and para-spinal region for sarcoma [PDF, 900 KB]

This booklet has been written for patients who are about to receive radiotherapy treatment to their spine or adjacent tissues for soft tissue sarcoma or bone sarcoma.

Radiotherapy to the spine for primary spinal cord tumours [PDF, 1,178 KB]

This booklet tells you about radiotherapy treatment for primary spinal tumours. The Christie is a specialised radiotherapy centre, and patients come for treatments that are not available in general hospitals. If you are having radiotherapy as an inpatient, please bring this booklet with you.

Same-day discharge following gynaecological oncology keyhole surgery [PDF, 110 KB]

This is an information sheet for gynaecological oncology patients who are being discharged the same day following their surgery.

Same-sex accommodation at The Christie [PDF, 133 KB]

The Christie is committed to providing a high-quality service including diagnosis, treatment and care to all our patients. We believe in safe and effective care focused on the individual needs of each person. Providing same-sex accommodation is an important way to improve the quality of care we provide to our patients.

Selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) [PDF, 150 KB]

This leaflet tells you about the procedure known as selective internal radiation therapy, also called radioembolisation. It explains what is involved and the benefits and risks. It may make you think of things you would like to discuss with your doctor/s.

Sentinel node biopsy for melanoma [PDF, 112 KB]

Sentinel node biopsy is a surgical technique for finding out how far some types of cancer have spread (staging). If we can find the sentinel node that drains the primary cancer area, remove it by surgery and examine it under microscope, early spread can be identified or ruled out.

Sexual health following blood stem cell transplantation for female patients [PDF, 111 KB]

Sexual health can be affected in many ways by having an HSCT (haematopoietic stem cell transplantation). The management of the concerns can often be simple but people may feel embarrassed about discussing such issues with health care professionals and so they may remain unresolved.

The aim of this leaflet is to help you see that you are not alone with your concerns and to give you the confidence to discuss them with your doctor or nurse who will try to help with any symptoms you may be experiencing.

Shingles (Herpes Zoster) [PDF, 101 KB]

Shingles is caused by the chickenpox (varicella-zoster) virus. It is a painful fluid-filled rash on one side of the body. You may hear the doctor call this herpes zoster as this is its medical name.

Short synacthen test [PDF, 109 KB]

This is an information sheet about the short synacthen test which checks if a body is producing enough steroid hormone.

Should I have a penile prosthesis, and which one should I choose? [PDF, 69 KB]

Deciding whether to have a penile implant and between a malleable or an inflatable penile prosthesis can seem rather daunting. This leaflet will help you make the decision.

Sick day rules: COVID-19 and the risk and management of adrenal insufficiency [PDF, 110 KB]

As you will be aware, it is important for you to increase your steroid (hydrocortisone or prednisolone) dose if you become unwell. You should already have received information and training in the ‘sick day rules’ and specific advice regarding COVID-19.

Skin cancer and war pensions [PDF, 111 KB]

Men and women with skin cancer who have served in the armed forces may be entitled to a one-off payment or regular pension if it is believed the tumour developed due to sun exposure during their period of service.

Skin care during and after your radiotherapy treatment [PDF, 135 KB]

This leaflet tells you about the effect radiotherapy can have on your skin. It gives you general skin care advice to help relieve the symptoms caused by a skin reaction.

Skin flap [PDF, 110 KB]

Removing a skin lesion results in a skin defect. If the surrounding skin is loose, the wound can be closed by bringing the edges together (direct closure). If this is not possible, skin has to be brought from another part of the body, either as a graft or a flap.

Skin graft [PDF, 111 KB]

Skin grafting is a surgical procedure in which a patch of skin is completely removed from another part of the body (called donor site) and used to cover the wound (called recipient site). You may have a wound due to surgery to remove a lesion as in skin cancer, a severe skin infection, or from an injury or burn.

Sleeping with ease [PDF, 185 KB]

Sleep disturbance or ‘insomnia’ can be extremely common during busy, stressful or challenging periods in our life. This may result in you finding it difficult to fall asleep when you go to bed, or ‘broken sleep’ resulting in you waking up after a few hours.

Smoking cessation and alcohol advice services at The Christie [PDF, 102 KB]

A free, confidential smoking cessation and alcohol advice service is available for patients and carers at The Christie, providing helpful advice and treatment. Read how you can access this service in our information leaflet.

Soft tissue sarcoma [Word, 353 KB]

Soft tissue sarcomas are an uncommon type of malignant disease, accounting for less than 1 in 100 of all adult cancers.  They can appear in supporting tissues of the body, such as muscle, fat, blood vessels or nervous tissues.

Specialist Allied Health Professional (AHP) brain and central nervous system tumour rehabilitation [PDF, 101 KB]

The specialists you are going to see are called AHPs (Allied Health Professionals). They specialise in rehabilitation for people with a diagnosis of a brain or spinal tumour, both low and high grade.

Spinal Cord Compression [PDF, 89 KB]

The spinal cord is the large bundle of nerves that runs from the brain to the bottom of the back. The bones of the spine (vertebrae) protect it. As it passes through each bone the spinal cord gives off smaller nerves called nerve roots. These supply the trunk, arms and legs with sensation (feeling), and control of muscles. This includes control of the bladder and bowel. Spinal cord compression is pressure on the spinal cord and its nerves.

You can also read this information in an accessible format on our Spinal cord compression: what it means and how it can be treated page.

Spinal Cord Compression: what to look out for [PDF, 87 KB]

This leaflet explains about spinal cord compression (pressure on the spinal cord and its nerves) and how it can be treated.

You can also read this information in an accessible format on our Spinal cord compression: What to look out for page.

Spiritual care: A guide for patients and their carers [PDF, 442 KB]

Your – or your loved one’s – world view, beliefs or faith can be an extraordinary source of strength and resilience when facing cancer and cancer treatment. At the same time, you may find these beliefs being challenged by what you are going through.

Squamous cell carcinoma [PDF, 104 KB]

Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is a type of skin cancer that affects the outer layer of the skin. It is the second most common type of skin cancer in the UK. Most people treated for SCC are completely cured with simple treatment.

You can also read this information in an accessible format on our Squamous cell carcinoma page.

Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiotherapy (SABR) to the bones [PDF, 115 KB]

This leaflet aims to help patients and their families understand more about stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) for cancer treatment to their bones. Please read this leaflet alongside The Christie booklet ‘Radiotherapy – a guide for patients and their carers’. Your clinical oncologist (specialist doctor) will also discuss the treatment with you.

You can also read this information in an accessible format on our Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiotherapy (SABR) to the bones page.

Stereotactive Ablative Body Radiotherapy (SABR) to lymph nodes [PDF, 145 KB]

This leaflet aims to help patients and their families understand more about stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) for cancer treatment to their lymph nodes.

You can also read this information in an accessible format on our Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiotherapy (SABR) to lymph nodes page.

Stereotactive Ablative Body Radiotherapy (SABR) to the adrenal gland [PDF, 144 KB]

This leaflet aims to help patients who are going to receive stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) for cancer treatment to their adrenal gland. Please read this leaflet alongside The Christie booklet 'Radiotherapy - a guide for patients and their carers'. Your clinical oncologist (specialist doctor) will also discuss the treatment with you.

Stereotactive Ablative Body Radiotherapy (SABR) to the liver [PDF, 111 KB]

This leaflet aims to help patients who are going to receive stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) for cancer treatment to their liver. Please read this leaflet alongside The Christie booklet 'Radiotherapy - a guide for patients and their carers'.

Stereotactive Ablative Body Radiotherapy (SABR) to the lung [PDF, 116 KB]

This leaflet aims to help patients and their families understand more about stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) for lung cancer treatment. Please read this leaflet alongside The Christie booklets 'Radiotherapy - a guide for patients and their carers' and 'Radiotherapy to the lung'.

You can also read this information in an accessible format on our Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiotherapy (SABR) to the lung page.

Stereotactive Ablative Body Radiotherapy (SABR) to the spine: The Christie at Salford [PDF, 111 KB]

This information is for patients who are going to receive stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) to their spine. Please read this leaflet alongside The Christie booklet 'Radiotherapy - a guide for patients and their carers'.

Steroids and your cancer treatment [PDF, 110 KB]

You have been given this leaflet because you have been prescribed a class of medication called steroids as part of your care. Steroids include tablets called Prednisolone and Dexamethasone. They can be given as tablets or injections into a vein.

Superior vena cava stent [PDF, 112 KB]

This leaflet tells you about the procedure known as superior vena cava stent. It explains what is involved and the benefits and risks. It may make you think of the things you would like to discuss with your doctor.

Surgical oncology unit information (Department 4) [PDF, 102 KB]

A booklet providing key information about the surgical oncology unit.

Swallowing exercises for patients receiving radiotherapy to the head and neck [PDF, 7,487 KB]

Swallowing is a process that involves co-ordinating several structures and muscles in your head and neck. This leaflet contains swallowing exercises that can strengthen the swallowing muscles. This can help you to continue eating and drinking for longer during radiotherapy and improves the likelihood of a better functional swallow after treatment.

The Christie supportive care team [PDF, 928 KB]

Supportive care in cancer is the prevention and management of the adverse effects of cancer and its treatment. Read about the services The Christie supportive care team offer and how you can access these as a Christie patient.

T

Going home after insertion of a tissue expander [PDF, 115 KB]

When you are discharged you may be referred to your district nurse to check the wounds and dressings. We will also give you a hospital appointment to attend to check your wounds.

Going home after your TRAM/DIEP reconstruction [PDF, 115 KB]

When you are discharged you may be referred to your district nurse to check the wounds and dressings. We will also give you a hospital appointment to attend to check your wounds.

Information about your post treatment thyroid scan [PDF, 75 KB]

This is an information sheet describing the preparation, process and precautions needed for a thyroid scan.

Radiotherapy to the skin: total skin electron beam therapy [PDF, 393 KB]

This booklet is to tell you about total skin electron beam therapy (TSEBT) which is radiotherapy delivered to the entire skin surface. The doctor, nurse or specialist radiographer will discuss your treatment with you and explain anything you do not understand.

Tapentadol (Palexia®) [PDF, 112 KB]

Tapentadol is used to treat pain that is difficult to control. The possible benefits of treatment vary; your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist will be happy to answer any questions you have about your treatment.

Targinact® (Oxycodone/naloxone) tablets [PDF, 111 KB]

Targinact® is used to treat pain that is difficult to control. The possible benefits of treatment vary; your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist will be happy to answer any questions you have about your treatment.

The Christie at Oldham [PDF, 102 KB]

This leaflet contains information about how to get to The Christie’s radiotherapy treatment centre in Oldham, the facilities and what happens on your first visit.

The Christie at Salford [PDF, 106 KB]

Read more about our radiotherapy treatment centre which is situated on the main site of Salford Royal hospital. This leaflet contains information about how to get here, the facilities and what happens on your first visit.

The Christie comment form: Easy read [PDF, 2,979 KB]

At The Christie, we are always trying to find better ways to help you. You can tell us what you like about The Christie or if there is anything we could do better.

The Christie cyclical dispensing scheme [PDF, 105 KB]

There are some medicines we use to treat cancer that only require you to see your consultant every few months to monitor your treatment and side effects. For these medicines you will be issued with a prescription for more than 1 cycle of your medicine at each appointment.

The Christie haematology clinical nurse specialist (CNS) service [PDF, 101 KB]

The haematology CNS service is offered by a team of experienced cancer nurses. They have specialist knowledge and skills in the care and support of people with haematological conditions. They work closely with your team of doctors.

The renal cancer oncology service [PDF, 101 KB]

We treat patients who are referred for treatment by surgeons or other oncologists. The team includes several doctors (registrars, clinical fellows, research fellows), a specialist nurse and a research team.

The specialist sarcoma nursing and physiotherapy service [PDF, 105 KB]

The service is provided by a team of highly qualified and experienced nurses. They have specialist knowledge and skills in the care and support of patients with sarcoma.

The specialist upper gastrointestinal (GI) nursing service [PDF, 102 KB]

The upper GI clinical nurse specialist is an experienced nurse who specialises in the care and support of people with cancers that affect the stomach, oesophagus (gullet), gall bladder, pancreas and liver.

You can also read this information in an accessible format on our specialist upper gastrointestinal (GI) nursing service.

Thymic epithelial tumours (thymoma and thymic carcinoma) [PDF, 704 KB]

The thymus is a gland in the chest, behind the breastbone (sternum). It is part of the immune system; making white blood cells lymphocytes) needed to help fight infection. It is usually at its largest size in adolescence then shrinks during adulthood, being replaced with fatty tissue.

You can also read this information in an accessible format on our Thymoma and thymic carcinoma page.

Thyroid cancer multi-disciplinary team (MDT) [PDF, 101 KB]

Following your cancer diagnosis, the doctors looking after you have referred you to The Christie for consideration of further treatment. It is our job to consider all the relevant information and after discussion with you to recommend a plan of action for treatment.

Total pelvic clearance for men [PDF, 537 KB]

This booklet provides information about your operation. The Christie has a specialised surgical team to treat your cancer. After discussion between you and your consultant’s team, it has been agreed that a pelvic clearance is needed to treat your cancer.

Total pelvic clearance for women [PDF, 576 KB]

This booklet provides information about your operation. The Christie has a specialised surgical team to treat your cancer. After discussion between you and your consultant’s team, it has been agreed that a pelvic clearance is needed to treat your cancer.

Trans-vaginal ultrasound [PDF, 108 KB]

A member of the ultrasound staff will escort you into the scanning room and introduce you to the radiologist. They will explain the procedure to you and answer your questions. If you have specific requirements about the gender of the radiologist carrying out the examination, please contact the ultrasound department before attending for the appointment.

Transfusion [PDF, 103 KB]

You have been advised that you need a red cell or platelet transfusion. This leaflet will cover what you need to do on the day of your transfusion appointment and what symptoms you’ll need to look out for.

You can also read this information in an accessible format on our Transfusion page.

Transition from Royal Manchester Children’s Hospital to The Christie [PDF, 105 KB]

Moving away from the team you know at Royal Manchester Children’s Hospital may be daunting. We hope that by involving you in the transition process, you will feel more confident and happier about the move.

Travelling and car parking for patients and visitors to The Christie [PDF, 396 KB]

We encourage patients and visitors to travel to and from The Christie using sustainable transport, such as cycling, walking or public transport. If you're arriving by car, we also have car parks with accessible parking (Blue Badge) spaces.

You can also read this information in an accessible format on our Directions and transport pages.

Treatment to the skin using a plastic treatment mould [PDF, 130 KB]

This leaflet is written for people who are having a type of radiotherapy called brachytherapy used for treatment of a skin tumour using a skin mould. Before you start your treatment, we will explain to you what the treatment involves, what the side effects are, and ask if you are willing to proceed.

You will usually have the treatment preparation and treatment as an outpatient at The Christie in Withington.

Tubogram [PDF, 109 KB]

This leaflet tells you about the procedure known as a tubogram. It explains what is involved and the benefits and risks. It may make you think of the things you would like to discuss with your doctor.

U

Living with a ureteric stent [PDF, 314 KB]

Because you have a problem with the drainage of urine from one, or both, of your kidneys the urologist is going to insert a ‘stent’ into one or both ureters. This is the tube that drains urine from your kidney to your bladder.

Ultrasound examination and biopsy [PDF, 111 KB]

This leaflet tells you about the procedure known as ultrasound guided biopsy. It explains what is involved and what the benefits and risks are.

Ultrasound-guided superficial biopsy [PDF, 137 KB]

A superficial biopsy is where the area to be biopsied lies just under the skin. Superficial biopsies can be done anywhere on the body, but the most common areas are the neck, armpits and groins.

Understanding steroids: guide for patients with brain tumours [PDF, 101 KB]

This booklet explains how steroids can help when you have a brain tumour. Tumours inside the skull are growing in a confined space and can cause pressure inside the skull. 

Ureteric stent exchange [PDF, 110 KB]

You will already have had a stent inserted through your urostomy into one or both of your kidneys, which drains urine into a bag. The stents require changing at 3 - 6 monthly intervals and this is referred to as ‘ureteric stent exchange’. It means your present stents are replaced with a new stent.

V

Changes to your body after cancer treatment (vulval and vaginal health) [PDF, 149 KB]

Many women report that their illness or treatment has affected them both physically and in terms of how they think and feel about themselves. This leaflet is best used alongside talking to your healthcare professionals about changes in your vulval and vaginal health due to treatment.

Radiotherapy for vulval cancer [PDF, 1,418 KB]

This booklet is written for women who are having radiotherapy to the vulva and/or groin areas for vulval cancer. It describes all possible treatments and some may not apply to you.

Surgery for vulval cancer [PDF, 591 KB]

This booklet has been written to help answer some of the questions you may have about your surgery for vulval cancer.

Vacuum Assisted Closure therapy [PDF, 189 KB]

Vacuum Assisted Closure therapy is used in the department of plastic surgery to help wound healing, or to keep a wound clean and sealed between multiple operations. It uses a vacuum (negative pressure) with specialised dressings.

Vaginal brachytherapy [PDF, 1,615 KB]

This booklet is written for patients who are having vaginal brachytherapy after a hysterectomy for cancer of the womb. The doctor and/or nurse will discuss your treatment with you and explain anything you do not understand.

Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) [PDF, 101 KB]

Enterococci are a type of bacteria always found in the human body. All of us have this type of bacteria in our intestines (gut) and in some women they are also present in the vaginal area and the urinary tract. Enterococci are also often found in the environment.

Varicocele embolization [PDF, 110 KB]

This leaflet tells you about the procedure known as varicocele embolisation. It explains what is involved and what the benefits and risks are. It may help you to think of things that you would like to discuss with your doctor.

Vena cava filter [PDF, 112 KB]

This leaflet tells you about the procedure known as vena cava filter insertion. It explains what is involved and the benefits and risks. It may make you think of the things you would like to discuss with your doctor.

Venous thromboembolism [PDF, 111 KB]

This leaflet is for if you have been diagnosed with a thrombus or blood clot. It will explain about cancer associated thrombosis and what you can expect. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to ask the clinician reviewing you or contact your specialist nurse.

Venting Gastrostomy Insertion [PDF, 113 KB]

This leaflet tells you about the procedure known as a venting gastrostomy and explains what is involved and what the benefits and risks are. It may help you think of things you would like to discuss with your doctor.

Video Endoscopic Inguinal Lymph Node Dissection (VEILND) for penile cancer [PDF, 175 KB]

This is an information sheet about VEILND which is a 'keyhole surgery' operation to remove a chain or group of lymph nodes, rather than a single lymph node, together with the surrounding body tissues in the groin).

W

The wig fitting service at The Christie [PDF, 102 KB]

If you experience hair loss due to your cancer treatment, you may wish to consider getting a wig. If you are an NHS patient and your treatment causes you hair loss, you are entitled to a Christie wig voucher which enables you to choose a free wig from a specific range.

Water deprivation test [PDF, 109 KB]

This is an information sheet about the water deprivation test which is used to diagnose or exclude Diabetes Insipidus.

Welcome to Ward 11 (department 4) [Publisher document, 377 KB]

Ward 4 can be found on the 3rd floor in department 4. The nearest entrance is the Oak Road main entrance. Read this leaflet to see our opening times, protected mealtimes, and how to contact the department.

What to look for after your biopsy [PDF, 103 KB]

Following your biopsy, there are several symptoms you’ll need to look out for. This leaflet explains what they are and who to contact if you do have any of the symptoms.

Wide bore mucinous drainage procedure [PDF, 110 KB]

Some patients can develop thick, mucinous abdominal fluid which builds up, causing swelling of the abdomen. The drain can reduce some of the swelling and improve some of the other symptoms.

Last updated: April 2024