Dr Claire Higham is a consultant endocrinologist at The Christie. She is also the co-lead of The Christie for Living Beyond Cancer Science. Her particular research interest is the late toxic effects of radiotherapy on the bone and pituitary gland.

Professor John Radford is the director of research and chairs the centre for Living Beyond Cancer Science steering committee. He is also leading several digital health projects. One of these, RAPID-digital, was recently designated a national exemplar by Health Data Research UK. 

Dr Safwaan Adam is a consultant endocrinologist at The Christie. He also maintains a clinical research portfolio in endocrinology. He has a particular interest in the use of large clinical outcome ‘real-world’ datasets to better inform clinical practice.

Dr Viktoria Chatzimavridou is a National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) academic clinical fellow in endocrinology and diabetes, based at The Christie. Her research interest is the late endocrine effects of cancer treatments. 

Fiona McCartin is a nurse in the endocrinology department at The Christie. She works on endocrine studies and provides research nurse support to the Living with and Beyond cancer studies.

Salina Tsui is a pharmacist working as a research fellow in the endocrine department at The Christie. Her research aims to understand and describe musculoskeletal health in adult haematological cancer survivors.

Dr Louise James is a senior project manager for Living with and Beyond Cancer at The Christie. This post aims is to develop robust clinical pathways for patients living with the consequences of their cancer treatment and to ensure research makes a real difference to people’s lives.

Rebecca Keeling is head of feasibility and set up within the endocrine research team, setting up trials which assist with the management of conditions such as congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) and acromegaly. The trials she assists in managing cover areas such as colorectal cancers, hepatobiliary cancers, neuroendocrine tumours and endocrinology. 

Dr Kim Linton is an academic clinician working at The Christie and The University of Manchester to improve outcomes for patients with lymphoma through the delivery of innovative and world-class research. Her goal is to develop individualised, effective and safe treatments for patients with blood cancers. 

Dr Rachel Broadbent is based at The Christie and is currently undertaking research in her role as a University of Manchester PhD student and clinical research fellow. Her research focuses on developing a lung cancer screening programme for people treated for Hodgkin lymphoma, in particular the factors which influence patients willingness to have the test and developing methods of helping Hodgkin lymphoma survivors make an informed decision. 

Last updated: December 2020