Clinical oncologists

Clinical oncologists are doctors who treat and manage patients with cancer using radiotherapy. They specialise in radiotherapy treatments. In some sarcoma centres, they also treat with chemotherapy.

Medical oncologists

Medical oncologists are doctors who treat and manage patients with chemotherapy or other types of drugs. These treatments are known as systemic anti-cancer treatments (SACT). Medical and clinical oncologists work together to deliver the best treatments for patients.

Surgery (oncology plastic surgeons)

Plastic surgeons can remove the cancer or part of the cancer with a surgical operation. They can also reconstruct the tissues following removal of the tumour.

Pathologists

A pathologist is a doctor who can look at cells under a microscope and diagnose the cell type. A team of pathologists who have expertise in sarcomas will review pathology specimens and participate in the multi-disciplinary team (MDT) meetings where the treatment and management of patients are discussed.

Sarcomas are so complex and specialised that all patients diagnosed by taking a sample or biopsy of the tumour will have the sample of the tissue sent to a specialist sarcoma pathologist. 

Radiologists

A radiologist is a doctor who diagnoses and treats disease using medical imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) scanning

Scans are a very important part of diagnosis and follow up of sarcoma.

Radiologists help decide which type of scan is the best option for the patient and which scans are needed to see if a tumour has spread. This is called ‘staging a cancer’. You may hear this referred to as a ‘staging scan’.