Patient booklets

The Christie produces a range of patient information that covers various aspects of cancer and cancer treatments.

Booklets are free to patients coming to The Christie and are available from the cancer information centre (department 3). The centre offers a confidential service for anyone affected by cancer. Please call in or contact us by telephone on 0161 446 8100.

We also offer a number of chemotherapy information sheets about individual chemotherapy treatments.

Or find it alphabetically:

C

Information about your CT scan

This information explains what happens when you come for a CT (computed tomography) scan. This is sometimes called a CAT Scan (computerised axial tomographic scan). The scanner is like a ring with a large hole, it is not an enclosed tunnel. The patient lies on the table which moves through this hole.

How to give a compliment, raise concerns or make a complaint

At The Christie, we welcome any feedback that you can give us – good or bad – about any aspect of your contact with the hospital. We need to know if we are not providing you or your relative or friend with a good service. We also like to know when we are getting things right.

Cancer of the penis (penile cancer)

Penile cancer is a rare cancer. The exact cause of the disease is not known. However, there are some factors which appear to increase a man’s risk of the disease.

After your cordotomy

Information sheet giving advice to patients on what to expect after having a cordotomy and what to do if any problems arise.

Checking your blood glucose levels

A booklet outlining how and why the nurse checks your blood glucose levels.

Colorectal and peritoneal oncology centre

Discharge information: things to remember

Use of the CADD Solis VIP pump at home

Your treatment has started today using a CADD Solis VIP pump. The CADD Solis pump is an electronic pump designed to administer your treatment whilst you are at home. You may also have a Baxter infusor pump attached containing normal saline to ensure your line doesn’t block between treatments.

Capecitabine for colorectal patients - Treatment Diary

If you experience significant side-effects whilst taking Capecitabine, your doctor may prescribe other treatments to relieve the symptoms and/or the Capecitabine may be stopped until the side-effects have settled. For subsequent cycles, a reduced dose of treatment may be prescribed

Clinical trials at The Christie [PDF file - 102KB]

The Christie is an international leader in cancer research and therefore you may be approached to take part in a research study or clinical trial. All information will remain entirely confidential and you will always be approached directly to take part in a clinical trial.

Information for patients taking capecitabine during radiotherapy to the head and neck

Your doctor has recommended that you have a course of capecitabine tablets along with your radiotherapy. Capecitabine is a chemotherapy drug taken by mouth.

Complex discharge team

The majority of inpatients will be given a predicted discharge date soon after their admission to hospital. This is widely recognised as good practice and improves the patient’s experience, helping them to feel more in control.

Clonazepam 1mg/1ml injection (Rivotril®) [PDF file - 115Kb]

Supportive care: specialist medicines

Clonazepam is used to treat pain that is difficult to control. The possible benefits of treatment vary; your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist will be happy to answer any questions you have about your treatment.

Clonazepam tablets [PDF file - 115Kb]

Supportive care: specialist medicines

Clonazepam is used to treat pain that is difficult to control. The possible benefits of treatment vary; your
doctor, nurse, or pharmacist will be happy to answer any questions you have about your treatment.

Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cell (CAR T cell) Therapy

Cellular therapy programme

CAR T cell therapy is a new treatment. It involves using your own body’s immune system to treat your cancer. Our immune systems monitor for unhealthy cells or foreign invaders such as infection or viruses. It uses several kinds of blood cells to destroy anything unfamiliar by recognising the unique protein (antigen) and identifying them as foreign.

After your MRI contrast/dye injection

Proton beam therapy unit

You have been given an injection of MRI contrast/dye to help highlight the area of interest on your magnetic resonance scan. A reaction to the contrast/dye is extremely rare. However, if a reaction does occur, this usually happens shortly after the injection. These effects are usually very mild and do not last long.

After your CT contrast/dye injection

Proton beam therapy unit

After your CT contrast/dye injection we will ask you to wait in the department with the cannula in your arm for a minimum of 15 minutes. We keep the cannula in place in case we need to give you some medication if you have a reaction. Although a reaction to the contrast/dye injection is extremely rare, there are certain factors that can increase the waiting time with the cannula in your arm to 30 minutes e.g. pre-existing conditions, certain medications etc.

After your contrast/dye injections

Proton beam therapy unit

You have been given a CT contrast/dye injection: After your CT contrast/dye injection we will ask you to wait in the department with the cannula in your arm for a minimum of 15 minutes. We keep the cannula in place in case we need to give you some medication if you have a reaction. Although a reaction to the contrast/dye injection is extremely rare, there are certain factors that can increase the waiting time with the cannula in your arm to 30 minutes e.g. pre-existing conditions, certain medications etc. If a reaction does occur, this usually happens shortly after the injection. These effects are usually very mild and do not last long.

Complementary health and well-being

A guide for patients and their carers to the complementary health and well-being service at The Christie.

Concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy for sarcoma

Radiotherapy is used with chemotherapy for two main reasons:
1. To reduce the number of cancer cells, which could be circulating around your body.
2. To shrink your cancer prior to radiotherapy.

The likelihood is that you will have started your chemotherapy and that radiotherapy will be advised at a
later date.

Information about your MRI contrast/dye

You have been given an injection of MRI contrast/dye to help highlight the area of interest on your magnetic resonance scan.

Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET)

Department of surgery

Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) is a non-invasive method used to assess the performance of the heart and lungs at rest and during
exercise.

The Christie cyclical dispensing scheme

There are some medicines we use to treat cancer that only require you to see your consultant every few months to monitor your treatment and side effects. For these medicines you will be issued with a prescription for more than 1 cycle of your medicine at each appointment. For
medicines which are a part of the cyclical dispensing scheme, the pharmacy will supply this in instalments; typically 1 cycle of medication
will be supplied in each instalment.

Colonic stent – your procedure explained

This leaflet tells you about the procedure called a colonic stent. It explains what is involved, and the benefits and risks. It may make you think of things you would like to discuss with your doctor.

Cholangiogram

This leaflet tells you about the procedure known as a cholangiogram. It explains what is involved and what the benefits and risks are. It may make you think of things you would like to discuss with your doctor.

Cystogram

This leaflet tells you about the procedure known as a cystogram. It explains what is involved and what the benefits and risks are. It may make you think of things you would like to discuss with your doctor.

Cortisol day curve [PDF file - 107KB]

Information sheet about the coristol day curve to check how much cortisol a body is producing.