Chemotherapy information sheets

Chemotherapy is a type of systemic anti-cancer therapy (SACT). Chemotherapy information sheets provide details about individual chemotherapy treatments. Your doctor will discuss your treatment with you when you come to The Christie.

Each information sheet includes:

  • name of drugs
  • the way the drugs are given, for example, injection or via a drip
  • treatment cycle (which days or weeks you have treatment and how long treatment lasts)
  • side effects and how to cope
  • contact numbers

Click on the name of the treatment you wish to view.

Or find it alphabetically:

E

E.C.F. / E.C.X.

This leaflet is offered as a guide to you and your family.  You will find it useful to refer to the booklet Chemotherapy: a guide which gives general information on chemotherapy and side effects.

Epirubicin

This leaflet is offered as a guide to you and your family.  You will find it useful to refer to the booklet Chemotherapy: a guide which gives general information on chemotherapy and side effects.

Epirubicin and Cyclophosphamide

This leaflet is offered as a guide to you and your family. The possible benefits of treatment vary; for some people chemotherapy may reduce the risk of the cancer coming back, for others it may control the cancer and its symptoms. Your doctor will explain to you whether you will receive chemotherapy or another type of treatment, or a combination of both. Your doctor or nurse will be happy to answer any questions you have about your treatment.

ESHAP

This leaflet is offered as a guide to you and your family.  You will find it useful to refer to the booklet Chemotherapy: a guide which gives general information on chemotherapy and side effects.

EOX: Epirubicin, Oxaliplatin and Capecitabine

This leaflet is offered as a guide to you and your family.  You will find it useful to refer to the booklet Chemotherapy: a guide which gives general information on chemotherapy and side effects.

Erlotinib (Tarceva)

This leaflet is offered as a guide to you and your family.  You will find it useful to refer to the booklet Chemotherapy: a guide which gives general information on chemotherapy and side effects.

Everolimus (Afinitor®) for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours

This leaflet is offered as a guide to you and your family. The possible benefits of treatment vary; for some people chemotherapy may reduce the risk of the cancer coming back, for others it may control the cancer and its symptoms.

Eribulin (Halaven®)

This leaflet is offered as a guide to you and your family. The possible benefits of treatment vary; for some people chemotherapy may reduce the risk of the cancer coming back, for others it may control the cancer and its symptoms. Your doctor will explain to you whether you will receive chemotherapy or another type of treatment, or a combination of both. Your doctor or nurse will be happy to answer any questions you have about your treatment.

EP - 5 days

This leaflet is offered as a guide to you and your family.  The possible benefits of treatment vary: for some people chemotherapy may reduce the risk of the cancer coming back, for others chemotherapy may control the cancer and its symptoms.  

Exemestane

In women, after the menopause, oestrogen is no longer made in the ovaries. Instead it is made in the fatty tissues of the body. This happens when an enzyme (a type of protein) called aromatase changes other hormones into oestrogen. Exemestane is a type of drug called an aromatase inhibitor. It blocks (inhibits) the activity of aromatase and reduces the amount of oestrogen in the body.

Everolimus (Breast)

This leaflet is offered as a guide to you and your family. Everolimus is a treatment which interferes with the way a protein called mTOR works. The protein mTOR makes cells divide and grow and it is often overactive in cancer cells. Everolimus is used to block the mTOR protein which helps to stop the cancer growing or slow it down.