Treatment

From first meeting to surgery, here's what you can expect:

Outpatient Clinic 

This is often the first time you'll meet your specialist colorectal surgeon. By this stage it's likely that your scans and histopathology results will have been discussed withother specialists at one of our multidisciplinary team meetings. The clinic visit is an opportunity to explain your results and discuss our thoughts. Having met you, we'll then work towards a recommendation for further treatment.

A Clinical Nurse Specialist will also be present to provide information and support you and your family. You'll also be given a contact number so you can discuss things further if you need. You're welcome to bring family members with you.

Pre-operative Assessment Clinic 

If you're having surgery you'll be invited to a pre-operative assessment. This is a chance for us to assess your fitness for surgery and make sure you have all the information you need. It will be run by specialist nurses. 

Read more about Pre-operative Assessment Clinics 

Enhanced Recovery Programme (ERP) 

We use a modern, evidence-based approach to help you recover more quickly after major surgery. In essence this is an education and training programme that helps you set goals and prepare for surgery and recovery. 

Read more about our Enhanced Recovery Programme 

Your Consent for Treatment 

You'll be asked to sign a consent form before you undergo any treatment, so it's important that you fully understand it. We make sure you have all the information you need and will give you a contact number so you can speak to your Clinical Nurse Specialist if you have any questions.

Research Integrated Within Treatment 

Wherever appropriate, we aim to recruit our patients to trials addressing important questions relevant to their condition and its treatment. Many of these are national trials involving other centres and are administered through the National Institute for Healthcare Research (NIHR). We sometimes ask our patients if they would be willing for some of the tissue removed at the time of their operation to be used for research purposes. This is collected under the governance of the Manchester Cancer Research Centre Biobank. 

Read more about NIHR 

Read more about the MCRC biobank 

Admission for treatment or surgery 

There are two main types of planned admission: 

'Day of' surgery admission 

  • You come in on the morning that the procedure is due to take place.
  • You'll be given specific instructions if you need to stop eating and drinking or need to take a bowel preparation to empty your colon.
  • 'Day case' patients can expect to leave the same day, so need to make plans to get home.
  • 'Overnight stay' patients can expect to stay for a number of nights. 

'Day before' surgery admission 

  • You'll be asked to arrive the day before treatment.
  • Before surgery you may need to have blood tests, see a specialist nurse or take a bowel preparation to empty your colon.
  • Your surgeon or Clinical Nurse Specialist can let you know how many nights you can expect to stay 

Additional Information for Cytoreductive Surgery and Heated Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy Patients: 

Patients undergoing open CRS and HIPEC 

  • You'll be admitted the day before surgery and will take a bowel preparation to empty your colon.
  • You'll also be marked for right and left stomas in case you need one.
  • You'll see a specialist who will explain the procedure again, before asking you to sign a consent form.
  • You'll see an anaesthetist to discuss plans for pain relief after surgery. This generally involves putting you to sleep and placing a 'central line' in a vein in the neck and an 'arterial line' in an artery in the wrist.
  • Most patients will have an 'epidural' in the spine for pain relief.
  • On the day of surgery you will go down to theatre at 8.15, where the anaesthetic will begin. The operation usually starts between 9 and 10 o'clock and lasts 8-10 hours. Please note that some operations may take longer. After the operation you will recover in our critical care unit overnight.
  • We routinely ask you if you would like us to contact a family member after your operation. 

Patients Undergoing Laparoscopic (Keyhole) CRS and HIPEC 

  • You'll usually be admitted on the day of surgery and will receive a phosphate enema.
  • You'll see a specialist who will explain the procedure, before asking you to sign a consent form.
  • You'll see an anaesthetist to discuss plans for pain relief after surgery.
  • On the day of surgery you will go down to theatre at 8.15, where the anaesthetic will begin. The operation usually starts between 9 and 10 o'clock and lasts 8-10 hours. Please note that some operations may take longer. After the operation you will recover in our critical care unit overnight.
  • We routinely ask you if you would like us to contact a family member after your operation

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