The Christie appoints first Freedom to Speak Up Guardian

Press release posted 17 August 2016

The Christie has appointed its first Freedom to Speak Up Guardian to help members of staff raise concerns about patient safety. 

Sue Mahjoob, 51, from Cheadle, is currently Patient Advice and Liaison Service Manager at The Christie in Manchester.

This new appointment involves helping to elevate the profile of raising concerns and to develop effective processes to enable staff at the specialist cancer hospital to confidently raise issues, including about patient safety. Acting in an independent capacity, Sue will also provide confidential advice and support when staff have concerns.

Sue will work alongside Christie board members to help support the organisation in listening to and learning from staff, so that the Trust continues to ensure high quality and compassionate care for patients.

Sue said: “I am excited about this new role. Listening to our staff and helping them raise concerns is important in ensuring that our patients have a good and safe experience at The Christie. 

I am looking forward to working with colleagues right across the Trust, to explain the purpose of this new role and encourage staff to raise any issues. I will be available to talk to anyone who has a concern, and to facilitate any issues being properly addressed in an open and supportive way. 

The NHS is keen to ensure that any concerns staff have are acted on in the interests of better patient care. Following the recommendations of Sir Robert Francis QC's Freedom to Speak Up report, all NHS Trusts should have nominated a Freedom To Speak Up Guardian by October 2016. Sue’s appointment will add to the growing network of NHS Guardians who are responsible for developing a culture where healthcare staff feel confident to raise concerns about patient care at all times. 

The Christie’s Chief Executive, Roger Spencer, said: “Patient safety and care is our prime concern. This is why encouraging our staff to raise concerns openly as part of normal day-to-day practice is an important part of improving the quality of our services.

To maintain our high standards, we want every member of our staff to feel able to raise a concern and be confident that the concern will be addressed in a constructive way. We welcome Sue’s appointment as our new Freedom to Speak Up Guardian, as another valuable point of contact where staff may discuss a concern in the interests of our patients.
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